Wildlife Photography Tips For TravellersWildlife Fotografie Tips voor Reizigers

We miss living in the land Down Under every day! Going through my photo’s, I found heaps of amazing Ozzie animal shots, so that’s why this month I’ll be covering wildlife photography! 

We missen het leven in het land Down Under nog elke dag! Toen ik door mijn foto’s ging, vond ik superveel geweldige plaatjes van Australische dieren, dus daarom ga ik het deze maand over het fotograferen van wildlife hebben! 

Wildlife Photography

 

Every month, I show you some of my own travel photos. For inspiration, but also to give you some quick tips on how to improve your own travel photography.

 

Into the Wild

I love to encounter wildlife on my travels. I’m not sure if the animals feel the same about me, as they usually try to run in the opposite direction of where I am as fast as they can… But nevertheless, I still manage every now and then to get a couple of them in front of my camera.

Now, first of all I don’t usually set out to go and look for wildlife photography opportunities specifically. The encounters and following shots usually ‘just happen’ with me. That and the fact that I have little patience, talk too much and seem to be a bit to slow sometimes to catch animals right in the action, might not make me the best person to give you advice on wildlife photography. But, for what it’s worth, here are some tips that helped me taking better shots nevertheless: 

 

 

Basic wildlife photography tips

 

1. Get to know your camera before you start taking pictures

I don’t have a fancy camera with a massive zoom lens. I have an old Nikon SLR with a 18-200 mm lens. I find this a perfect travel lens, as I don’t have to carry any other lens, don’t have to change them all the time and can still take photos up close and a bit further away. For smaller animals like birds, or animals that are quite far away, you want to be thinking more towards a 300-500 mm zoom lens. Again, I’m not a camera pro, but I’ve figured out how to set my camera to manual focus (essential when trying to catch an animal through foliage, for example) and how to use it in different light situations, working ISO, aperture and shutter speed all together. It’s a few things that are easy to learn that make a big difference. 

 

2. Take lots of shots, from various angles

Don’t feel like you have to get the perfect shot at once. Do you know how many shots a professional photographer takes? Well, I once saw this documentary of a couple that worked for National Geographic. I think they shot about 4000 frames. They only used about 10 of them – and still edited the photo afterwards. So no worries, take your time, take lots of shots and don’t forget to take photos from every angle you can come up with as well to give a bit more variation to your shots. For example, take a portrait shot, one that includes more habitat in context to the animal, another close-up of details, such as face, hoofs, tails, etc.

 

3. Don’t put yourself or the animal in danger

Seems obvious, but when you spot that rhino, you might get as excited as these girls I met in Nepal, running towards the -ehm dangerous!- animal armed with cameras to get the best shot. Not so clever, and not quite necessary too (says the girl that was sitting high and safe on an elephants back getting all the good shots, but still…) I rather don’t interfere with the animal in his natural habitat at all when taking a photo, so I keep my distance as much as needed. 

 

4. Focus

If you have a close-up of an animal, try and focus on the eye to make it pop out. If you can get eye contact with the animal, that’s great, as it creates a connection between the animal and the viewer. You really get drawn into the image. It’s almost as if the animal gets it’s own personality that way.

You can also draw focus to the animal by blurring the background, like you would in portrait photography. There is a couple ways of doing this, by a wide aperture for example, but also by trying to get as much distance between the subject and the background. 

 

5. Evoke Emotion

With wildlife photography, you really want to give the viewer an insight into the world of the animal your shooting. One of the best ways to do this is to get on the same level as the animal. 

Another thing you can do is by looking for things around the animal that can help you create emotion, such as the children looking for the penguin in the photo below. 

 

6. Get Close(r)

Now, as I said before, usually as soon as animals notice you, they will take of, but getting as close as possible to an animal (physical or with a zoom lens) gives the image an extra dimension. Try and lie down on the floor to become less noticeable, wear camouflaging clothes, hide behind trees and buildings… or simply look for slower animals to practice on first :)

 

7. Pay attention to the background

Background in a wildlife shot is all important. If you shoot the animal from a standing position (from above), that means the ground will form the immediate background of your shot. This will only look good if the background adds something to the photo (as the photo below showing the great camouflage of the thorny devil), rather than just being distracting. 

If you get low on the ground and shoot the animal from that angle, the background of the shot will be much further away, so you can capture the animal in sharp focus, while blurring out the background. This will isolate the animal and makes it stand out quite well. Another trick, that you can see in the koala shot, is to use the foreground (blurred/soft focus) to add an extra layer onto the photo to create depth when you can’t get the background blurred.

And finally, sometimes the background really helps create a story in your photo, especcialy when it’s unusual (such as the sea/beach being behind the kangaroo) or gives the suggestion your animal is moving (as the winding roads in front of the emu’s in the picture below)

 

  

Wildlife Photography

Koala, QLD Australia

 

Wildlife Photography

Penguin, VIC Australia

 

Thorny Devil, NT Australia

 

Kangaroo, NSW Australia

 

Emu’s, WA Australia

 

 

More wildlife photography tips from the experts

Now that you’ve read a bit about the basics of wildlife photography, you might want to get more into it and become a pro. I’ve found these resources for you that can help you create even better pictures of wildlife:

 

 

 

Wildlife photography inspiration

Besides tips, you may just want to look at some amazing wildlife photography, so I’ve looked up the names of ‘s Worlds best wildlife photographers for you. Go and Google them now!

Mattias Klum – Art Wolfe – Marina Cano – Morkel Erasmus – Andy Rouse – Jan Vermeer – Giulio Zanni – Joel Sartore – Klaus Nigge – Brian Hampton – Kudich Zsirmon – Bence Mate – Charles Glatzer – Jim Brandenburg – C.S.Ling – Danny Green – John Hyde – Siddhardha Garige – Mario Moreno – Roselien Raimond – Federico Veronesi – Amir Ayalon – Tim Laman – Kalyan Varma – Edwin Kats – Frits Hoogendijk – Rathika Ramasamy – Werner Bollmann – Nikolai Zinoviev – Brian Skerry – Marsel Van Oosten – Alex Saberi – Jon Cornforth – John Isaac – David Maitland – Cyril Ruoso – Stefano Unterthiner – Denver Bryan – Shah Rogers – Ganesh H Shankar – Daisy Gilardini – Paul Nicklen – Thomas D Mangelsen – Steve Bloom – David Llyod – Paul Souders – Austin Thomas – Michael Nichols – Nick Brandt – Grant Atkinson – Richard Peters – Alexander Mustard – Andrew Parkinson – Hennie van Heerden – Urszula Kozak – Stephen Earle – Roeselien Raimond – Wolf Ademeit – Tom Hadley – Stephen Oachs – Frans Lanting – Laura Dyer – Mark Dumbleton – Susan McConnell…

 

 

Do you have a favourite wildlife photographer? Let me know in the comment section!

Wildlife Photography

 

Elke maand laat ik je een aantal van mijn eigen reisfoto’s zien. Ter inspiratie, maar ook om je snelle tips te geven om je eigen reisfotografie te verbeteren.

 

Into the Wild

Ik hou ervan om wilde dieren op mijn reizen tegen te komen. Ik weet niet of de dieren daar net zo over denken als ik, omdat ze meestal druk bezig zijn met het in tegenovergestelde richting van mij rennen, zo snel als ze kunnen… Maar toch, ik krijg het af en toe toch voor elkaar om er wat voor mijn lens te krijgen.

Nou ga ik er meestal niet speciaal voor op pad om wildlife te fotograferen hoor. De momenten ‘gebeuren’ meestal gewoon. Dat in acht genomen, plus het feit dat ik vrij weinig geduld heb, teveel praat en ook een beetje te traag ben soms om de dieren in actie te zien, maakt mij misschien niet de beste persoon om je advies te geven over het fotograferen van wildlife. Maar ach, hier zijn toch een aantal van mijn tips die mij in ieder geval hielpen om betere foto’s te nemen: 

 

 

Basis wildlife fotografie tips

 

1. Leer je camera kennen voordat je begint met schieten

Ik heb niet echt een heel bijzondere camera met een enorme zoomlens. Ik heb een oude Nikon SLR met een 18-200 mm lens. Ik vind dit een perfecte reislens, omdat ik niet echt een andere lens bij me hoef te dragen, hem niet steeds hoef te wisselen en toch foto’s kan nemen die zowel dichtbij als redelijk ver weg zijn. Voor kleinere dieren zoals vogels, of dieren die best ver weg zijn wil je misschien toch meer richting de 300-500 mm zoom gaan. Nogmaals, ik ben geen camera pro, maar ik ben erachter gekomen hoe ik mijn camera op manual focus kan zetten (essentieel als je een dier door gebladerte wilt fotograferen bijvoorbeeld) en hoe ik hem moet gebruiken in verschillende lichtsituaties, terwijl ik ISO, sluitertijd en diafragma allemaal samen laat werken. Het zijn een paar dingen om te leren, die niet heel moeilijk zijn, maar die echt een groot verschil maken. 

 

2. Neem veel verschillende shots, vanuit verschillende hoeken

Denk niet dat je gelijk het perfecte shot moet krijgen. Weet je wel hoeveel frames een professionele fotograaf gemiddeld neemt? Ik zag ooit een docu waarin een stel dat werkte voor de National Geographic gevolgd werd. Ik geloof dat ze voor een bepaalde serie ongeveer 4000 frames schoten. Daar gebruikten ze er ongeveer 10 van – en alsnog moesten ze die foto’s nog bewerken. Dus echt, neem je tijd, neem veel foto’s en vergeet niet om de foto’s van veel verschillende standpunten te nemen voor wat meer variatie. Neem bijvoorbeeld een foto in portretstand, een waarbij je wat meer van de omgeving ziet in relatie tot het dier, een close-up met details, zoals een gezicht, hoef, staart, enz… 

 

3. Breng jezelf of het dier niet in gevaar

Het lijkt logisch, maar als je die neushoorn ziet kun je misschien net zo enthousiast worden als die meiden die ik in Nepal tegenkwam en die recht op de -eh gevaarlijke!- neusheur gingen rennen met hun camera’s om het beste shot te krijgen. Niet zo slim dus en ook niet echt nodig (maar ik zat dan ook hoog en droog op de rug van een olifant). Ik zou liever niet het dier storen in zijn natuurlijke omgeving als ik foto’s neem, dus houdt ik afstand zoveel als nodig is.

 

4. Focus

Als je een close-up van een dier hebt, probeer dan altijd op het oog te focussen om het echt naar voren te laten komen. Als je oogcontact met het dier kunt krijgen is dit nog beter, want dat zorgt voor een connectie tussen het dier en de kijker. Je wordt dan echt in het beeld getrokken. Het is bijna of het dier zo ook persoonlijkheid krijgt. 

Je kunt ook focus op het dier krijgen door de achtergrond onscherp te maken, zoals je zou doen in portretfotografie. Er zijn een aantal manieren om dit te doen, zoals het gebruiken van een wijd diafragma bijvoorbeeld, maar ook door ervoor te zorgen dat er zoveel mogelijk afstand is tussen het onderwerp en de achtergrond. 

 

5. Wek emotie op

Met wildlife fotografie wil je de kijker echt een kijkje in de wereld van het dier laten zien. Een van de beste manieren om dat te doen is door om hetzelfde hoogte als het dier te komen.

Wat je ook kunt doen is te kijken of er iets in de omgeving van het dier is dat meer emotie kan toevoegen, zoals de kinderen die naar de pinguïn gluren op de foto hier beneden. 

 

6. Ga dicht(er)bij

Zoals ik al eerder zei, zal het hier gelijk wegrennen zodra hij je ziet, maar het zo dicht mogelijk bij het dier komen (fysiek of met een zoom lens) zal de foto wel een extra dimensie geven. Probeer op de grond te gaan liggen en zo minder op te vallen, draag camouflerende kleding, verstop je achter een boom of gebouwen… of ga eerst wat oefenen op de wat langzamere dieren :)

 

7. Let op de achtergrond

Achtergrond in een foto met wildlife is erg belangrijk. Aks het dier staand fotografeert (van boven), betekent het dat de grond de directe achtergrond van je plaat wordt. Dit zal er alleen goed uitzien als de achtergrond iets aan de foto toevoegt (zoals de foto beneden die de camouflage van de thorny devil laat zien), dan dat het juist afleidend is. 

Als je laag bij de grond bent en het dier vanuit die hoek op de foto zet, zal de achtergrond van de foto een stuk verder weg zijn en dus kan je het dier met een scherpe focus in beeld krijgen, terwijl de achtergrond vaag is. Dit zal het dier isoleren en naar voren doen komen. Nog een trucje, dat je in de koala foto kunt zien, is om de voorgrond te gebruiken (vaag/softe focus) om een extra laag op de foto te plaatsen en zo extra diepte te scheppen als je de achtergrond niet vaag kunt krijgen.

En ten slotte kan de achtergrond je soms helpen een verhaal in je foto te brengen, vooral als het iets ongewoons is (zoals de zee/strand achter de kangoeroe) of de suggestie geeft dat het dier beweegt (zoals de kronkelende weg voor de emoes in de foto hier beneden)

 

  

Wildlife Photography

Koala, QLD Australia

 

Wildlife Photography

Penguin, VIC Australia

 

Thorny Devil, NT Australia

 

Kangaroo, NSW Australia

 

Emu’s, WA Australia

 

 

Meer wildlife foto tips van de experts

Nu je een beetje gelezen hebt over de basis van wildlife fotografie, wil je er misschien meer van weten en een echte pro worden. Ik vond deze bronnen voor je die je kunnen helpen om nog beter te worden in het nemen van foto’s van wilde dieren:

 

 

 

Wildlife Fotografie Inspiratie

Naast tips, vind je het misschien leuk om gewoon alleen te kijken naar een aantal geweldige foto’s van wildlife. Ik heb de namen opgezocht van ‘s wereld beste wildlife fotografen. Nu kun je ze zelf Googlen voor de mooiste platen!

Mattias Klum – Art Wolfe – Marina Cano – Morkel Erasmus – Andy Rouse – Jan Vermeer – Giulio Zanni – Joel Sartore – Klaus Nigge – Brian Hampton – Kudich Zsirmon – Bence Mate – Charles Glatzer – Jim Brandenburg – C.S.Ling – Danny Green – John Hyde – Siddhardha Garige – Mario Moreno – Roselien Raimond – Federico Veronesi – Amir Ayalon – Tim Laman – Kalyan Varma – Edwin Kats – Frits Hoogendijk – Rathika Ramasamy – Werner Bollmann – Nikolai Zinoviev – Brian Skerry – Marsel Van Oosten – Alex Saberi – Jon Cornforth – John Isaac – David Maitland – Cyril Ruoso – Stefano Unterthiner – Denver Bryan – Shah Rogers – Ganesh H Shankar – Daisy Gilardini – Paul Nicklen – Thomas D Mangelsen – Steve Bloom – David Llyod – Paul Souders – Austin Thomas – Michael Nichols – Nick Brandt – Grant Atkinson – Richard Peters – Alexander Mustard – Andrew Parkinson – Hennie van Heerden – Urszula Kozak – Stephen Earle – Roeselien Raimond – Wolf Ademeit – Tom Hadley – Stephen Oachs – Frans Lanting – Laura Dyer – Mark Dumbleton – Susan McConnell…

 

 

Heb jij een favoriete wildlife fotograaf? Laat het me hieronder weten! 

Tags from the story
Written By
More from Nienke Krook

[:en]Cultural Travel – Vintage Travel Photo[:nl]Cultuur Reizen – Vintage Reisfoto[:]

[:en]My grandfather Hans Krook was a published travel writer and took his...
Read More

3 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge