Why You Should Travel With Kids – 1 Minute VideoWhy You Should Travel With Kids – 1 Minute Video

Why you should travel with kids? I’ve met a lot of people travelling with their child(ren) for a longer period of time. Amazing! I think travelling with the entire family is a great way of teaching kids about the world.

Why you should travel with kids? I’ve met a lot of people travelling with their child(ren) for a longer period of time. Amazing! I think travelling with the entire family is a great way of teaching kids about the world.

Kids don’t just read about the trees, plants, animals, food and people of a country, they can actually see, smell, feel and touch them… Ok, maybe you don’t want them touching crocodiles or a random local, but you know what I mean.  

Outside the textbook

When I was a child, my parents took me and my brother (at age 4 and 1, later 7 and 4) to the small island of St. Maarten (St. Martin) in the Caribbean for 3 months in 1987 and 1989. My dad had to work there, but for us it was (besides daily school lessons by mum) one big adventure.

I learned how to swim, what a carnival parade looks like, what coconut and spare ribs taste like and how it sounds to hear people sing from a church window on a Sunday morning.

I made friends with kids of who’s language I didn’t speak, learned about the history of Fort Amsterdam and sang to wild pelicans every day. And when I got back home, it turned out I was further ahead with my school work than the rest of the class. So travelling with children for this period of time doesn’t have to mean they miss out on important learning skills in school – on the contrary!  

Australian road trip with children

In Australia, 2008, I met a little boy called Bailey (you can meet him in the above video). His parents took him on a family road trip and they stayed in the Outback place ‘Daly Waters’ for a couple of days.

Bailey quickly learned how to spend his days: he helped selling souvenirs and ice cream and gave tours of the area to passing travellers.

Can you imagine all the things he learned? Talking to groups of people, counting money, repeating historical information, seeing wild birds nest and remembering all this at the same time…. and what about all the things there was still to learn on the rest of his trip – Wow! I think that Australia is a perfect country to travel with your child, especially if you’re a native English speaker. There are so many information signs along most popular routes, that makes it fun for kids to read, write and talk about things around them. All the signs have pictures, Aboriginal stories and fun facts on them. Most visitor centres have excellent guides as well, most of the time especially made for kids, to learn even more about a certain area.

Why you should travel with kids

Even if your kids don’t speak English, let them draw what animals or plants they find, bring a book in your own language about the country you’re travelling in and let them make scrapbooks and collect treasures to bring their stories back home to share with family, friends and classmates.

Make travelling with children as fun and educational as it can (and will) get!

What is your tip for teaching children on the road?

 
 

And thank you for either commenting here or on my Social Media channels:

 

 

Kids don’t just read about the trees, plants, animals, food and people of a country, they can actually see, smell, feel and touch them… Ok, maybe you don’t want them touching crocodiles or a random local, but you know what I mean.

 

 

Outside the textbook

When I was a child, my parents took me and my brother (at age 4 and 1, later 7 and 4) to the small island of St. Maarten (St. Martin) in the Caribbean for 3 months in 1987 and 1989. My dad had to work there, but for us it was (besides daily school lessons by mum) one big adventure.

 

I learned how to swim, what a carnival parade looks like, what coconut and spare ribs taste like and how it sounds to hear people sing from a church window on a Sunday morning.

I made friends with kids of who’s language I didn’t speak, learned about the history of Fort Amsterdam and sang to wild pelicans every day. And when I got back home, it turned out I was further ahead with my school work than the rest of the class.

So travelling with children for this period of time doesn’t have to mean they miss out on important learning skills in school – on the contrary!

 

 

Australian road trip with children

In Australia, 2008, I met a little boy called Bailey (you can meet him in the above video). His parents took him on a family road trip and they stayed in the Outback place ‘Daly Waters’ for a couple of days.

 

Bailey quickly learned how to spend his days: he helped selling souvenirs and ice cream and gave tours of the area to passing travellers.

Can you imagine all the things he learned? Talking to groups of people, counting money, repeating historical information, seeing wild birds nest and remembering all this at the same time…. and what about all the things there was still to learn on the rest of his trip – Wow!

I think that Australia is a perfect country to travel with your child, especially if you’re a native English speaker. There are so many information signs along most popular routes, that makes it fun for kids to read, write and talk about things around them. All the signs have pictures, Aboriginal stories and fun facts on them.

Most visitor centres have excellent guides as well, most of the time especially made for kids, to learn even more about a certain area.

 

Why you should travel with kids

Even if your kids don’t speak English, let them draw what animals or plants they find, bring a book in your own language about the country you’re travelling in and let them make scrapbooks and collect treasures to bring their stories back home to share with family, friends and classmates.

 

Make travelling with children as fun and educational as it can (and will) get!

What is your tip for teaching children on the road?

 
 

En bedankt voor het achterlaten van een berichtje hier of op mijn Social Media kanalen:

 

 

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