What Hiking Really Should Be About – 2 Minute Travel Video

[:en]Watch and Listen to this porter singing on the Annapurna Sanctuary Hike. This is what real hiking should be all about: getting to know the local people and enjoying it! In March 2011 we hiked the Annapurna Sanctuary Route in Nepal. In 11 days, we walked from Nayapul to the Annapurna Base Camp (+4130m) and back to Pokhara. It was tough (very tough for me as I am the least sportive person on the planet), but the scenery was absolutely beautiful and reaching the top felt great. Looking back at the video’s my boyfriend shot (I was too busy dying all the time), there was something else that struck me and remembered me why we both enjoyed our trip so much: we had so much fun with the locals! The people of the Annapurna region are open, friendly and always in for a good laugh.

Meeting the Nepali people enhanced our trip in ways no mountain range alone could ever do.

Some people just don’t get it

After a couple of days, we met a group of 10 Finnish hikers. They all had professional walking clothes and sticks and every time we met them, they walked in the same order – one after the other. They didn’t have a Nepalese porter or guide, we never really heard them talk to each other and when we’d arrive at one of the guest houses for the night, they would go straight to bed after dinner… Then we met a French girl, who organized trips to this area and came to check out the route her customers would walk. She was alone, only stopped at the local guest houses to heat up her 3 minute noodle packages (and even haggled about the cost of the boiled water) and then she’d ploughed on. When we were still far from reaching the top, we met her coming down… A Chinese couple hired a porter, but seemed to have forgotten that it was a living person… they brought there own food to eat along the way (the porter didn’t bring food and therefore could only eat at the end of the day at the guest house). Then they walked about twice the amount other people would on a day and kept pushing the porter to go further.

In the end he was so tired that he slipped off a rock into the river – but even soaking wet they’d made him walk further…

Why hiking?

I really don’t understand why some people are so closed off from the fact that it’s not just about reaching the top of the mountain. For me, hiking should be about:

  • Supporting the local people by eating their food, buying there handmade souvenirs and sleeping in their guesthouses;
  • Respecting your porter/guide by giving them enough moments to rest, eat and socialize with other locals;
  • Taking time to really take in the beautiful scenery around you, not just focussing on reaching the top;
  • Taking time to talk to your porter/guide and the local villagers and to understand why they live the way they do and how you can support them;
  • Having lots of fun and cherishing every moment (see the video)

 

Did you ever go on a hike and had a chance to meet locals? Did your porter also tell you that you walk like a chicken and only after reaching the top ‘upgraded’ you to a mountain goat?

[:nl]Watch and Listen to this porter singing on the Annapurna Sanctuary Hike. This is what real hiking should be all about: getting to know the local people and enjoying it!

In March 2011 we hiked the Annapurna Sanctuary Route in Nepal. In 11 days, we walked from Nayapul to the Annapurna Base Camp (+4130m) and back to Pokhara. It was tough (very tough for me as I am the least sportive person on the planet), but the scenery was absolutely beautiful and reaching the top felt great.

Looking back at the video’s my boyfriend shot (I was too busy dying all the time), there was something else that struck me and remembered me why we both enjoyed our trip so much: we had so much fun with the locals! The people of the Annapurna region are open, friendly and always in for a good laugh.

Meeting the Nepali people enhanced our trip in ways no mountain range alone could ever do.

 

Some people just don’t get it

After a couple of days, we met a group of 10 Finnish hikers. They all had professional walking clothes and sticks and every time we met them, they walked in the same order – one after the other. They didn’t have a Nepalese porter or guide, we never really heard them talk to each other and when we’d arrive at one of the guest houses for the night, they would go straight to bed after dinner…

Then we met a French girl, who organized trips to this area and came to check out the route her customers would walk. She was alone, only stopped at the local guest houses to heat up her 3 minute noodle packages (and even haggled about the cost of the boiled water) and then she’d ploughed on. When we were still far from reaching the top, we met her coming down…

A Chinese couple hired a porter, but seemed to have forgotten that it was a living person… they brought there own food to eat along the way (the porter didn’t bring food and therefore could only eat at the end of the day at the guest house). Then they walked about twice the amount other people would on a day and kept pushing the porter to go further.

In the end he was so tired that he slipped off a rock into the river – but even soaking wet they’d made him walk further…

Why hiking?

I really don’t understand why some people are so closed off from the fact that it’s not just about reaching the top of the mountain. For me, hiking should be about:

  • Supporting the local people by eating their food, buying there handmade souvenirs and sleeping in their guesthouses;
  • Respecting your porter/guide by giving them enough moments to rest, eat and socialize with other locals;
  • Taking time to really take in the beautiful scenery around you, not just focussing on reaching the top;
  • Taking time to talk to your porter/guide and the local villagers and to understand why they live the way they do and how you can support them;
  • Having lots of fun and cherishing every moment (see the video)

 

Did you ever go on a hike and had a chance to meet locals? Did your porter also tell you that you walk like a chicken and only after reaching the top ‘upgraded’ you to a mountain goat?

[:]

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