[:en]Travel Memories from Jan [Budget Travel Talk][:nl]Reisherinneringen van Jan [Budget Travel Talk][:]

[:en]

 “What is your most memorable childhood travel memory?” That’s what I’ve asked over 50 travel bloggers and other travel addicts. These are their personal stories and photos. 

 

Today, I interview Jan from Budget Travel Talk!

 

 

Hi Jan, do you remember the first time you went travelling? 

A few years after the koala photo (see below) was taken in Brisbane, my parents had a stint managing a hotel complex on Magnetic Island near our home in North Queensland. Unlike the fast catamarans that ply the route today, we travelled over on the Mandalay, an old monohull ferry boat, known by locals of the day to be a two stubby (beer) ride.

Attempting to walk while she rocked and rolled her way to the Island was a challenge – waves broke over the bow and spray flew. I remember very well the feeling of exhilaration and the spray on my face.

 

On the Island I was allowed to travel in the front cab of a delivery truck that was collecting pineapples to be transported to the mainland. There was just the truck driver (whom my parents knew) and his son Patrick, the same age as myself. I remember my excitement at being away from my family, if only for an hour, and my anticipation as the truck struggled up the hills and flew down the slopes .

 

Patrick and I gripped the bench seat, the 1960’s being well before the seatbelt era. He was a bit of a pro and either possessed or feigned nonchalance, but I just hoped we would not plunge into the blue/green water and rocks far below.

 

Another memory, not so exciting, was choking on a fish bone in the Hotel’s Dining Room. Rushed outside under the coconut palms, I was encouraged to eat dry bread – an “old wives remedy” as I tried to cough it up.

 

 

Did your parents travel much before you were born?

No, neither sets of parents did. Times were more about day to day living back then.

 

 

What was your favourite holiday destination as a child, a teenager and an adult? 

 

Childhood

I have already spoken about Magnetic Island, so I will claim the Whitsundays, Queensland, as my favourite childhood destination. Well, let’s call it a tie. We towed our caravan the 260 km south to Airlie Beach and I made sure I made myself scarce when it was time to reverse the van and put up the annexe. Some things are just too stressful. Apart from that it was a relaxed holiday. Fishing, watching T.V. in the amenities block at night (we had no T.V. in the van or at home) and tearing around the park with the other kids, were the highlights.

 

Teenager

Before I commenced my working life, I was drawn on family holidays to Brisbane. It was this teenager’s dream – boutique shopping for jeans and tie-dyed tee shirts – it was the hippy era, man. I started working when I was fifteen, even though I was bright and my teachers urged me to stay at school, and saved the earnings from my office job for a trip to Tasmania with my girlfriend at age 17. We were away for 6 weeks, three of which were spent getting the 3,289 km each way from Townsville to Tasmania, and the other three exploring the island state.

 

Adult

My favourite holiday as an adult is very hard to choose but I will go with our 2012 trip to Spain, Portugal and Morocco. That holiday had so many different aspects, from house-sitting in a Spanish hilltop village, to riding camels in the Sahara Desert, it was a winner.

 

 

Can you tell me what your memory is with this image? 

 

 

Travel Memories from Jan [Budget Travel Talk]

 

I was five years old at the time so my memories are vague, but I do remember thinking how amazing it was that I was able to hold a real koala, and wondering fleetingly if I could keep it. Although I was born and raised an Australian, it was the first time I had seen a koala outside of a story book.

I met my koala at Lone Pine Sanctuary near Brisbane on a long road trip (my first) from Townsville to Sydney, a distance of 2,067 km.

 

 

Can you remember a specific travel item/gadget you used to take on a trip as a child?

The back seats of our huge succession of family vehicles were littered with pillows and blankets. My brother and I were bundled into the car still in our P.J.’s at about 4 a.m. from where we slept and fought alternately until breakfast time.

On the road entertainment consisted mainly of games of eye spy and number plates. On arrival at our destination, out would come the plastic buckets and spades, floaties, beach balls, and cricket sets. After washing up and before bed time were family card and board games. There were no electronic gadgets.

 

 

Did the way you travelled as a child changed much when you grew up?

As a child air travel was too expensive so we always did road trips, or a quick boat trip. We were budget travellers, especially then. Holidays might not have included restaurant meals, but they did have relaxed fish and chips under the stars. Our road trips did not involve stopping at tourist attractions – once on the road my father was a demon – he just wanted to get there!

 

My husband and I flew to Europe and spent 9 months backpacking, travelling by campervan and living on a farm in the U.K. at the beginning of our relationship, but when we had our own children we reverted to my family’s pattern of road trips, even though they were further afield.

Even though we had more disposable income than both sets of parents ever dreamed of, we still travelled in the same way. We just value added with more experiences like snow skiing, water skiing and visiting local attractions. We both have fond memories of our childhood holidays and would not change a thing about then or now.

 

 

Finally: What is your best tip for making a trip memorable?

An optimistic attitude is all that is needed to make each trip one to remember. It is inevitable that things will go wrong occasionally, but when they do, I try to go with the flow (in retrospect if not initially).

We experienced Mekong river life up close and personal, when our tiny boat broke down an hour north of Luang Prabang in Laos. In the company of four strangers from four different countries, and a driver only one of us could communicate with, our trip had a value added component, and became a treasured memory. 

 

 

If you want to read more of Jan’s stories, be sure to visit her website:
 Budget Travel Talk.

 

 

Click below for the Travel Memory Interview Archive:

 

Childhood Travel Memory Interviews

 

[:nl]

“Wat is jouw meest memorabele reisherinnering uit je kindertijd?” Dat vroeg ik meer dan 50 reisbloggers en andere reisgekken. Dit zijn hun persoonlijke verhalen en foto’s.

 

Vandaag interview ik Jan van Budget Travel Talk!

 

 

Hi Jan, do you remember the first time you went travelling? 

A few years after the koala photo (see below) was taken in Brisbane, my parents had a stint managing a hotel complex on Magnetic Island near our home in North Queensland. Unlike the fast catamarans that ply the route today, we travelled over on the Mandalay, an old monohull ferry boat, known by locals of the day to be a two stubby (beer) ride.

Attempting to walk while she rocked and rolled her way to the Island was a challenge – waves broke over the bow and spray flew. I remember very well the feeling of exhilaration and the spray on my face.

 

On the Island I was allowed to travel in the front cab of a delivery truck that was collecting pineapples to be transported to the mainland. There was just the truck driver (whom my parents knew) and his son Patrick, the same age as myself. I remember my excitement at being away from my family, if only for an hour, and my anticipation as the truck struggled up the hills and flew down the slopes .

 

Patrick and I gripped the bench seat, the 1960’s being well before the seatbelt era. He was a bit of a pro and either possessed or feigned nonchalance, but I just hoped we would not plunge into the blue/green water and rocks far below.

 

Another memory, not so exciting, was choking on a fish bone in the Hotel’s Dining Room. Rushed outside under the coconut palms, I was encouraged to eat dry bread – an “old wives remedy” as I tried to cough it up.

 

 

Did your parents travel much before you were born?

No, neither sets of parents did. Times were more about day to day living back then.

 

 

What was your favourite holiday destination as a child, a teenager and an adult? 

 

Childhood

I have already spoken about Magnetic Island, so I will claim the Whitsundays, Queensland, as my favourite childhood destination. Well, let’s call it a tie. We towed our caravan the 260 km south to Airlie Beach and I made sure I made myself scarce when it was time to reverse the van and put up the annexe. Some things are just too stressful. Apart from that it was a relaxed holiday. Fishing, watching T.V. in the amenities block at night (we had no T.V. in the van or at home) and tearing around the park with the other kids, were the highlights.

 

Teenager

Before I commenced my working life, I was drawn on family holidays to Brisbane. It was this teenager’s dream – boutique shopping for jeans and tie-dyed tee shirts – it was the hippy era, man. I started working when I was fifteen, even though I was bright and my teachers urged me to stay at school, and saved the earnings from my office job for a trip to Tasmania with my girlfriend at age 17. We were away for 6 weeks, three of which were spent getting the 3,289 km each way from Townsville to Tasmania, and the other three exploring the island state.

 

Adult

My favourite holiday as an adult is very hard to choose but I will go with our 2012 trip to Spain, Portugal and Morocco. That holiday had so many different aspects, from house-sitting in a Spanish hilltop village, to riding camels in the Sahara Desert, it was a winner.

 

 

Can you tell me what your memory is with this image? 

 

 

Travel Memories from Jan [Budget Travel Talk]

 

I was five years old at the time so my memories are vague, but I do remember thinking how amazing it was that I was able to hold a real koala, and wondering fleetingly if I could keep it. Although I was born and raised an Australian, it was the first time I had seen a koala outside of a story book.

I met my koala at Lone Pine Sanctuary near Brisbane on a long road trip (my first) from Townsville to Sydney, a distance of 2,067 km.

 

 

Can you remember a specific travel item/gadget you used to take on a trip as a child?

The back seats of our huge succession of family vehicles were littered with pillows and blankets. My brother and I were bundled into the car still in our P.J.’s at about 4 a.m. from where we slept and fought alternately until breakfast time.

On the road entertainment consisted mainly of games of eye spy and number plates. On arrival at our destination, out would come the plastic buckets and spades, floaties, beach balls, and cricket sets. After washing up and before bed time were family card and board games. There were no electronic gadgets.

 

 

Did the way you travelled as a child changed much when you grew up?

As a child air travel was too expensive so we always did road trips, or a quick boat trip. We were budget travellers, especially then. Holidays might not have included restaurant meals, but they did have relaxed fish and chips under the stars. Our road trips did not involve stopping at tourist attractions – once on the road my father was a demon – he just wanted to get there!

 

My husband and I flew to Europe and spent 9 months backpacking, travelling by campervan and living on a farm in the U.K. at the beginning of our relationship, but when we had our own children we reverted to my family’s pattern of road trips, even though they were further afield.

Even though we had more disposable income than both sets of parents ever dreamed of, we still travelled in the same way. We just value added with more experiences like snow skiing, water skiing and visiting local attractions. We both have fond memories of our childhood holidays and would not change a thing about then or now.

 

 

Finally: What is your best tip for making a trip memorable?

An optimistic attitude is all that is needed to make each trip one to remember. It is inevitable that things will go wrong occasionally, but when they do, I try to go with the flow (in retrospect if not initially).

We experienced Mekong river life up close and personal, when our tiny boat broke down an hour north of Luang Prabang in Laos. In the company of four strangers from four different countries, and a driver only one of us could communicate with, our trip had a value added component, and became a treasured memory. 

 

 

Als je meer van Jan’s verhalen wilt lezen, bezoek dan zeker haar website:
 Budget Travel Talk.

 

 

Klik hieronder voor het Reisherinnering Interview Archief:

 

Childhood Travel Memory Interviews

 

[:]

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