[:en]Travel Memories from Jaillan [Savoir There][:nl]Reisherinneringen van Jaillan [Savoir There][:]

[:en]

 “What is your most memorable childhood travel memory?” That’s what I’ve asked over 50 travel bloggers and other travel addicts. These are their personal stories and photos. 

 

 Today, I interview Jaillan from Savoir There!

 

 

Hi Jaillan, do you remember the first time you went travelling? 

Most of my childhood memories (and my grown up ones come to that) are intertwined with travel, so it’s genuinely hard to pinpoint ‘a first time’. I moved round a lot as a kid and travelled to see family in places like Tunisia, Denmark, and the rather less glamorous Newcastle upon Tyne. 

 

My earliest travelling memory was probably a European road trip with my parents, seeing the Eiffel tower for the first time (in my head I can see it from my hotel room, but I’m sure that memory has been through some generous post-production).

 

I can recall eating melba toast in the hotel room, being told it was exotic and what the French ate for breakfast but I realise now that we probably just didn’t have the money for the hotel buffet!

 

 

Did your parents travel much before you were born?

My parents are from very different backgrounds – my mother a working class miner’s daughter from Northern England who had never travelled, my father an upper class Egyptian from a prominent Cairo family, fresh from a stint living in Libya when he came to study in the UK.

This unlikely pair travelled to Beirut together before I was born and I only wish I’d been around to experience excitement of visiting The Paris of the Middle East as it was in the ‘60s. My dad tells stories about the craziness of Beiruti society in those days, the sense of hedonism and possibility was palpable.

 

 

What was your favourite holiday destination as a child, a teenager and an adult? 

 

Childhood

I didn’t take many ‘holidays’ as such as a kid, but the frequent travel to visit family overseas influenced me more than I realised as to this day I rarely treat a trip as a holiday -more as a chance to find out what it would be like to live somewhere else. I like apartment rental, going to the local supermarket, exploring residential neighbourhoods and getting under the skin of a place rather than lying on a beach or by a pool for days on end.

 

Teenager

I grew up in London and as a teenager my favourite place to go was another city – Aarhus in Denmark where I’d visit my dad. That wasn’t exactly a holiday either as I just joined in everyday life there, but I enjoyed the ‘otherness’ of it and that sensation is still what I look for in travel.

 

Adult

As an adult my favourite place to actually holiday has been Ventimiglia, the first border town you come to after crossing from the French Riviera over to the Italian side.  Once the European borders were removed the ‘Raison d’être’ of the place, the booze shops and Cambios disappeared and I find the odd atmosphere unique and relaxing.

It’s where I go to actually take a holiday from travel. It’s the only place in the world where I get joy from being a creature of habit; repetition is usually my mortal enemy but here I do the same things over and over again – have dinner at the local pizzeria, walk up to the old towns at Ventimiglia Alta and Bordighera Alta, shop at the Friday market, go and people-watch in Monaco, and on longer trips visit the artists’ colony at Bussana Vechia, promenade along the sea walls in Menton, back over the border into France and lie on the unsignposted little local beach, which is the only sandy beach on this stretch of coast for miles.Because I can go whenever I like (I have access to a flat there through family) I don’t feel pressurised, I can do as much or little as I feel like, knowing I can always come back.

 

 

Can you tell me what your memory is with this image? 

 

 

Travel Memories from Jaillan [Savoir There]

 

This is a picture of me with my mum and dad in Egypt as a young child – I didn’t go back again until I was 13, so it holds really fond memories for me, although being so young they’re quite scrambled. I remember the heat, the smells and the music, and hanging out with family a lot.

 

 

Can you remember a specific travel item/gadget you used to take on a trip as a child?

All my early memories of airplanes involve wearing my tickets in a plastic pouch around my neck emblazoned with the words ‘unaccompanied minor’. Be-lipsticked stewardesses would lean down to talk to me in my seat and give me little packets of colouring books and other goodies.

I just yearned to be grown up enough to travel solo and be as pretty as the stewardesses, but now that I have a leather wallet for my tickets and the stewardesses are handing me glasses of wine not toys, I’d quite like to turn the clock back!

 

 

Did the way you travelled as a child changed much when you grew up?

When I travel I actually feel like a kid again. Perhaps that’s why I do it so much.

 

Finally: What is your best tip for making a trip memorable?

Push your comfort zone. There’s a fine line between acknowledging that you’re still you, wherever in the world you are and realising that cut free from the expectations of those around you, you can probably do anything. 

 

I’m no adventure traveller but I’ve done zip lines in the Alps, reverse bungee jumps in Bali and Singapore, rode horses through rivers in Iceland, motorbiked in the Caribbean and Laos, cliff dived in The Philippines and (not very successfully) waterkiied in Switzerland and I’m fresh back from tree climbing in The Gambia – with the bruises to prove it. I probably wouldn’t do any of that stuff on a day I’d woken up in my own bed.

 

 

If you want to read more of Jaillan’s stories, be sure to visit her website:
 Savoir There.

 

 

Click below for the Travel Memory Interview Archive:

 

Childhood Travel Memory Interviews

 

[:nl]

“Wat is jouw meest memorabele reisherinnering uit je kindertijd?” Dat vroeg ik meer dan 50 reisbloggers en andere reisgekken. Dit zijn hun persoonlijke verhalen en foto’.

 

Vandaag interview ik Jaillan van Savoir There!

 

 

Hi Jaillan, do you remember the first time you went travelling? 

Most of my childhood memories (and my grown up ones come to that) are intertwined with travel, so it’s genuinely hard to pinpoint ‘a first time’. I moved round a lot as a kid and travelled to see family in places like Tunisia, Denmark, and the rather less glamorous Newcastle upon Tyne. 

 

My earliest travelling memory was probably a European road trip with my parents, seeing the Eiffel tower for the first time (in my head I can see it from my hotel room, but I’m sure that memory has been through some generous post-production).

 

I can recall eating melba toast in the hotel room, being told it was exotic and what the French ate for breakfast but I realise now that we probably just didn’t have the money for the hotel buffet!

 

 

Did your parents travel much before you were born?

My parents are from very different backgrounds – my mother a working class miner’s daughter from Northern England who had never travelled, my father an upper class Egyptian from a prominent Cairo family, fresh from a stint living in Libya when he came to study in the UK.

This unlikely pair travelled to Beirut together before I was born and I only wish I’d been around to experience excitement of visiting The Paris of the Middle East as it was in the ‘60s. My dad tells stories about the craziness of Beiruti society in those days, the sense of hedonism and possibility was palpable.

 

 

What was your favourite holiday destination as a child, a teenager and an adult? 

 

Childhood

I didn’t take many ‘holidays’ as such as a kid, but the frequent travel to visit family overseas influenced me more than I realised as to this day I rarely treat a trip as a holiday -more as a chance to find out what it would be like to live somewhere else. I like apartment rental, going to the local supermarket, exploring residential neighbourhoods and getting under the skin of a place rather than lying on a beach or by a pool for days on end.

 

Teenager

I grew up in London and as a teenager my favourite place to go was another city – Aarhus in Denmark where I’d visit my dad. That wasn’t exactly a holiday either as I just joined in everyday life there, but I enjoyed the ‘otherness’ of it and that sensation is still what I look for in travel.

 

Adult

As an adult my favourite place to actually holiday has been Ventimiglia, the first border town you come to after crossing from the French Riviera over to the Italian side.  Once the European borders were removed the ‘Raison d’être’ of the place, the booze shops and Cambios disappeared and I find the odd atmosphere unique and relaxing.

It’s where I go to actually take a holiday from travel. It’s the only place in the world where I get joy from being a creature of habit; repetition is usually my mortal enemy but here I do the same things over and over again – have dinner at the local pizzeria, walk up to the old towns at Ventimiglia Alta and Bordighera Alta, shop at the Friday market, go and people-watch in Monaco, and on longer trips visit the artists’ colony at Bussana Vechia, promenade along the sea walls in Menton, back over the border into France and lie on the unsignposted little local beach, which is the only sandy beach on this stretch of coast for miles.Because I can go whenever I like (I have access to a flat there through family) I don’t feel pressurised, I can do as much or little as I feel like, knowing I can always come back.

 

 

Can you tell me what your memory is with this image? 

 

 

Travel Memories from Jaillan [Savoir There]

 

This is a picture of me with my mum and dad in Egypt as a young child – I didn’t go back again until I was 13, so it holds really fond memories for me, although being so young they’re quite scrambled. I remember the heat, the smells and the music, and hanging out with family a lot.

 

 

Can you remember a specific travel item/gadget you used to take on a trip as a child?

All my early memories of airplanes involve wearing my tickets in a plastic pouch around my neck emblazoned with the words ‘unaccompanied minor’. Be-lipsticked stewardesses would lean down to talk to me in my seat and give me little packets of colouring books and other goodies.

I just yearned to be grown up enough to travel solo and be as pretty as the stewardesses, but now that I have a leather wallet for my tickets and the stewardesses are handing me glasses of wine not toys, I’d quite like to turn the clock back!

 

 

Did the way you travelled as a child changed much when you grew up?

When I travel I actually feel like a kid again. Perhaps that’s why I do it so much.

 

Finally: What is your best tip for making a trip memorable?

Push your comfort zone. There’s a fine line between acknowledging that you’re still you, wherever in the world you are and realising that cut free from the expectations of those around you, you can probably do anything. 

 

I’m no adventure traveller but I’ve done zip lines in the Alps, reverse bungee jumps in Bali and Singapore, rode horses through rivers in Iceland, motorbiked in the Caribbean and Laos, cliff dived in The Philippines and (not very successfully) waterkiied in Switzerland and I’m fresh back from tree climbing in The Gambia – with the bruises to prove it. I probably wouldn’t do any of that stuff on a day I’d woken up in my own bed.

 

 

Als je meer van Jaillan’s verhalen wilt lezen, bezoek dan zeker haar website:
 Savoir There.

 

 

Klik hieronder voor het Reisherinnering Interview Archief:

 

Childhood Travel Memory Interviews

 

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