[:en]Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos[:nl]Traditioneel Duits Eten in het Zwarte Woud: Foto’s om bij te Watertanden[:]

[:en]I’m four weeks into my diet and all I can think about is food now. Recognize that? I figured that the best way to deal with it was to write it off in a blog post on some of the amazing traditional German food that I tasted as part of the #JoinGermanTradition campaign I did a couple of weeks ago.

 

Let me take you to Germany’s Black Forest region in the state of Baden Württemberg, as we explore the culinary paradise that you can find here. And yes, there will be cake. Lots of cake.

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

A Short Introduction to Southwest Germany’s Traditional Food

As the German region of Baden Württemberg is so close to the French and Swiss border, it’s no surprise that their kitchen has been influenced by these neighbours. Combining that with the region’s fertile soil and warm climate, you get an abundance of products and an even bigger variety of delicious meals.

 

Don’t forget to pair your meals with traditional Baden wines. Most famous are the Gutedel, Müller-Thurgau, Riesling, Silvaner, Grau- and Weißburgunder, Bacchus, Chardonnay, Nobling, Muskateller, Kerner, Traminer and Blau Spätburgunder.

 

There are many cellars open for a visit and local wine festivals are being celebrated throughout the summer and autumn. In fact, I’ll be returning to this region in the autumn to tell you all about this!

Of course beer and many alcoholic fruit schnapps are also made in this region for generations. In fact, The Black Forest has the highest density of distilleries in the world (over 14,000!).

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

They call it Kirch-Wasser (Cherry Water) – but I don’t recommend brushing your teeth with this unless you’re Ke$ha or something…

 

Sensational Spätzle

The German answer to pasta is Spätzle and they are a specialty of this region. Knöpfle are the short & round version found in the Baden region. They are made from flour, eggs, water, and salt and have a much more moist and soft dough than pasta that cannot be rolled out.

You have to like Play-Doh squeeze it through holes, much like a garlic press. They are then boiled much like you would gnocchi.

WHERE TO EAT: The Spätzle below, together with a delicious meat skewer with a cherry-sauce was at Hotel Gasthof Kreuz in Wolfach. The other one below that was at Hausbrauerei Feierling in Freiburg (hidden under the MASSIVE Schnitzel).

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

Amazing Asparagus

With a boyfriend from Venlo in The Netherlands (Almost the asparagus capital of Europe), I’ve been introduced to this ‘white gold’ for a couple of years now, but I must say that the Germans also really do them amazingly well (I think, actually that Nick’s family always buys them just across the border, but don’t tell anyone).

The asparagus season is short: it begins in April and runs through June. During this time, you will find asparagus on pretty much any restaurant menu in Germany.

Asparagus consist of 95% water and are very low in calories (hurray for my diet – boo for drowing them in cheese sauce) and are generally quite healthy for you.

Random Facts: Until the 18th century, asparagus were considered a luxury food and only eaten by the wealthy. White asparagus are those that haven’t yet been touched by sunlight. They are particularly mild in taste. Green asparagus are a different variety, their stem is thinner and they are more flavorful.

WHERE TO EAT: I enjoyed my meal with asparagus, kartoffeln (potatoes) and Schnitzel (breaded veal cutlet) at the restaurant of Hofgut Sternen in Breitnau/Hinterzarten.

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

Spectacular Schwarzwälder Schinken

Ahh… now this is a famous export product from the Black Forest. Their Ham. The secret of the real authentic Black Forest ham is a long maturation, which generally takes about three months. But don’t worry, there is plenty to go around. Every restaurant is stocked with them!

Black Forest ham is the best-selling smoked ham in Europe. After curing the meat in salt for about two weeks (followed by 2 weeks curing without salt), it is cold-smoked for several weeks, during which time the original Black Forest ham becomes almost black on the outside.

In the EU, the name is protected, but in the USA and Canada you will find various commercially produced hams of varying degrees of quality to be sold unrightfully under this name. So if you want to be sure, head over to Germany friends!

WHERE TO EAT: I saw the meat being smoked at the open air museum Vogtsbauerhof in Gutach, as well as an entire museum dedicated to this ham in the tower on top of the Feldberg in the place Feldberg.

Then I finally tasted it at the restaurant of Hofgut Sternen in Breitnau/Hinterzarten, who didn’t really understand that I just wanted to try a bit of it as a starter, so they gave me my massive plate of asparagus together with two sandwiches of ham and other stuff… a wee bit too much… hence the diet :)

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

Yummy Yogurteis & Blissful Berries

When driving around the Black Forest, you’ll probably come across some massive trucks transporting milk. The Germans, just like the Dutch, love their dairy products! Of course it’s not just milk, but also yoghurt that they make with it here. Or even better: yoghurt ice cream *ahh!*

Combine your ice cream it with fresh berries from the area, or delicious pancakes, and you’re ready to start the day well for sure!

WHERE TO EAT: We spoiled ourselves at Hofgut Sternen in Breitnau/Hinterzarten before heading off to hike the local gorge. As you should.

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

Perfect Pellkartoffeln mit Quark

This dish might not be the best looking one of them all, but once you’ve tasted it, you’ll love it! The Pellkartoffeln are like Jacket Potatoes, and the Quark is a fresh cheese made from warmed soured milk. It’s very light in calories and taste.

They often served quark to accompany breads or vegetables as a starter or even a light breakfast. You can also use it as a kind of yogurt and top it with fruit or granola.

WHERE TO EAT: I had a very traditional version of this meal at the open air museum Vogtsbaurenhof in Gutach. Some days of the week, a lady is cooking here in the old-fashioned way and she uses herbs from her own garden to add some secret ingredients to the quark. Yum!

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

Beloved Brezels

While I always knew them as Pretzels, the real word for these tasty, salty bread twisty-things is a Brezel, but whatever the name, I LOVE them and always try to get one when in Germany.

While you can pretty much get brezels all around Germany, they are really most well-known in the states of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg. Lucky me! 

They are really baked for consumption on the same day and you can also find them sliced and buttered (Butterbrezel) or even served with slices of cold meats or cheese.

WHERE TO EAT: I got one at the airport in Basel, but ate it too fast to take a picture *gulp*, but this one below is at Hausbrauerei Feierling in Freiburg, where you can eat it like you’re supposed to: with a good glass beer.

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

Great Grillwurst

If you’re in Freiburg, you have to try out this local specialty called the ‘Lange Rote’ (the ‘Long Red One’). It’s a grilled 35-centimeter long spicy sausage, made from finely ground pork and bacon, folded in two (if you don’t want to look like a tourist, eat it unfolded) and placed in a bun with onions (although there are some who believe this shouldn’t be added), ketchup and mustard on top.

They call it the ‘King of the Sausages’ in Freiburg and it’s definitely a great snack. Without that skin that you would normally find on a sausage, it’s just very easy to eat and gives it a special, gold-yellow colour.

WHERE TO EAT: For 2,50 Euro at the Münsterplatz, Freiburg, Just say ‘ein Lange Rote, bitte!’ – there will be a queue though!

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

Fantastic Flammkuchen

Another great South-German dish is the Flammkuchen and these also come in different shapes and sizes. It basically is nothing more than bread dough rolled out very thin in the shape of a rectangle (traditionally) or circle, then covered with white cheese or crème fraîche, thinly sliced onions and lardons… but it’s sooooo good as an afternoon snack or lunch!

According to history, the dish comes from farmers who used to bake bread once a week or every other week and baked a flammkuchen to test the heat of their wood-fired ovens. The heat would bake it in 1-2 minutes, leaving a nearly burned crust around the edges.

WHERE TO EAT: I had to wait for it quite a bit, but when they finally served me at the Schwarzbrennerei in Titisee, I couldn’t have enjoyed it more. Together with a Johannisbeersaft (Currant juice), I had a great little lunch! (And just check their cute interior below as well!)

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

Lavish Linzertorte

Ok, this cake is originally from Austria (named after the city of Linz), but served in Germany regularly, especially around Christmas time. The cake is made from short, crumbly pastry filled with with almonds, raspberry jam and -of course- some raspberry liquor. Topped with powdered sugar.

Cool fact: The Linzer Torte is said to be the oldest cake in the world!

WHERE TO EAT: I had my slice at the little kiosk next to the kids playground at the open air museum Vogtsbaurenhof in Gutach. But I’m sure they serve it in plenty of places around the Black Forest!

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

 

Of course I’ve kept the best cake of them all for last:

Kissable Kirschtorte

If one thing is a symbol of the kitchen in the Black Forest, it’s definitely the Schwarzwalder Kirschtorte, or the Black Forest Gateau. layers of chocolate cake, spread with with whipped cream and cherries between each layer. The cake is then decorated with more whipped cream (because you can never have enough, really), maraschino cherries, and chocolate shavings.

What I didn’t know about was the secret ingredient: Kirch. Or better known as “a-clear-liquor-that -makes-you-unfit-to-drive-after-eating-just-one-slice-of-this-cake”. Because yes, the people of the Black Forest love the cake drowned in this!

WHERE TO EAT: I had a very, very good slice of the cake (read: very, very full of liquor) at the Dorotheenhütte in Wolfach. But then again, I made it myself.

 

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

 

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Practical

Want to know more about (traditional) food in Germany? Have a look at the Social Wall of the #JoinGermanTradition Campaign.

 

Black Forest Hotel Suggestions: I had a lovely stay at the following hotels during my stay in Germany:

Park Hotel Post
Eisenbahnstraße 35/37, 79098 Freiburg
Phone: +49 (0)761 385480
Website: www.park-hotel-post.de

Hofgut Sternen
Höllsteig 76, 79874 Breitnau/Hinterzarten
Phone: +49 (0) 7652 9010
Website: www.hofgut-sternen.de

Gasthof Hotel zum Hecht
Hauptstraße 51, 77709 Wolfach
Phone:+49 7834 538
Website: www.hecht-wolfach.de

 

Disclaimer: I was invited by the German Tourism Office as part of the #JoinGermanTradition Blog Trip in June 2015, created and executed by iambassador in cooperation with the Dutch office of the German Tourism Authority. All photos and experiences in this post are, like always, 100% my own.

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Now it's your turn!

Which of these dishes is your favourite? Have you tried any of them yet? Let me know in the comments below!

 

And thank you for sharing this article on Pinterest:

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | Travel Travel Tester

 [:nl]Ik ben sinds vier weken op dieet en kan nu alleen nog maar aan eten denken. Herken je dat? Ik besloot dat de beste manier om hier mee om te gaan het van me afschrijven hier op de blog was. En dus ga ik het hebben over enkele van de geweldige traditionele Duitse gerechten die ik proefde als onderdeel van de #JoinGermanTradition campagne die ik een aantal weken geleden deed.

Laat me je meenemen naar het Zwarte Woud van Duitsland, te vinden in de deelstaat Baden Württemberg. We gaan op ontdekkingstocht naar het culinaire paradijs dat je hier kunt vinden. En ja, er komt taart bij kijken. Heel veel taart.

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Een Korte Introductie op het Traditionele Eten van Zuid-Duitsland

Omdat de Duitse regio van Baden Württemberg zo dicht bij de Franse en Zwitserse grens ligt, is het geen verrassing dat ook hun keuken door deze buren is beïnvloed. Als je dat combineert met de regio’s vruchtbare grond en klimaat, krijg je een hoeveelheid aan producten en een nog grotere verscheidenheid in maaltijden.

Vergeet je niet je maaltijden te combineren met de traditionele Baden wijnen. Het meest bekend zijn de Gutedel, Müller-Thurgau, Riesling, Silvaner, Grau- and Weißburgunder, Bacchus, Chardonnay, Nobling, Muskateller, Kerner, Traminer en Blau Spätburgunder.

Er zijn veel wijnkelders open voor bezoekers en lokale wijnfestivals worden de hele zomer en herfst gehouden. Ik ga trouwens zelf naar deze regio terug in de herfst om je daar alles over te vertellen!

Natuurlijk worden bier en veel soorten alcoholische fruit schnapps ook al generaties lang in deze regio gemaakt. Het Zwarte Woud heeft zelfs de grootste dichtheid aan distilleerderijen in de wereld (meer dan 14,000!).

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Ze noemen het Kirch-Wasser (Kers Water) – maar ik kan je niet aanraden hier je tanden mee te poetsen, tenzij je Ke$ha bent ofzo…

Sensationele Spätzle

Het Duitse antwoord op pasta is Spätzle en het is echt een regionale specialiteit. Knöpfle zijn de korte, ronde versie die je in de Baden regio veel vindt. Ze zijn gemaakt van meel, eieren, water en zout en hebben een veel vochtiger en zachter deeg dan pasta dat je niet kunt uitrollen.

Je moet het een beetje op de Play-Doh manier door gaatjes persen, bijna net als een knoflookpers. Ze worden daarna gekookt, een beetje op de manier zoals je gnocchi klaarmaakt.

WAAR TE PROEVEN: De Spätzle hier beneden, samen met een heerlijke vleesspies met kersensaus was bij Hotel Gasthof Kreuz in Wolfach. Die daaronder was bij Hausbrauerei Feierling in Freiburg (verstopt onder de ENORME Schnitzel).

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Amazing Asperges

Met een vriend uit Venlo (Zo ongeveer de asperge hoofdstad van Europa), ben ik al sinds een paar jaar geïntroduceerd tot dit ‘witte goud’, maar ik moet zeggen dat de Duitsers ze ook echt heerlijk maken (Ik geloof dat Nick zijn familie ze ook altijd net over de grens kopen, maar vertel dat maar niet door).

Het asperge seizoen is maar kort: het begin in April en gaat door tot Juni. Tijdens deze periode zul je asperges in bijna elk restaurant in Duitsland op de kaart zien staan.

Asperges bestaan uit 95% water en zijn dus laag in caloriën (jeeh voor mijn dieet – boe voor het verdrinken van die dingen in de kaassaus) en ze zijn over het algemeen ook erg gezond voor je.

Random Feitje: Tot de 18e eeuw werden asperges gezien als luxe artikel en alleen door de rijken gegeten. Witte asperges zijn die die nog niet door de zon zijn geraakt. Ze zijn vooral mild in smaak. De groene zijn een andere soort, hun stam is dunner en ze hebben meer smaak.

WAAR TE PROEVEN: Ik had een erg lekkere maaltijd met asperges, kartoffeln en Schnitzelin het restaurant van Hofgut Sternen in Breitnau/Hinterzarten.

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Spectaculaire Schwarzwälder Schinken

Ahh… dit is nu echt een beroemd export product vanuit het Zwarte Woud. De Ham. Het geheim van de echte authentieke Zwarte Woud Ham is een lange rijping, die gewoonlijk ongeveer drie maanden duurt. Maar wees gerust, er is genoeg voor iedereen. Elke restaurant heeft een flinke portie op voorraad!

Schwarzwälder Schinken is de meestverkochte ham in Europa. Na het inmaken met zout voor twee weken (gevolgd door nog 2 weken inmaken zonder zout), wordt de ham droog gerookt voor enkele weken, waarna de originele Schwarzwälder Schinken bijna zwart aan de buitenkant wordt.

In de EU is de naam beschermd, maar in de USA en Canada zul je verschillende commercieel geproduceerde hammen van verschillende gradaties in kwaliteit tegenkomen, onterecht dus onder deze naam. Dus als je zeker van je zaak wil zijn is het dus óp naar Duitsland!

WAAR TE PROEVEN: Ik zag het vlees gerookt worden bij het openluchtmuseum Vogtsbauerhof in Gutach, en bezocht zelfs een compleet museum gewijd aan deze ham in de top van de toren bovenop de Feldberg in de plaats Feldberg.

Daarna ging ik het dan eindelijk proeven in het restaurant van Hofgut Sternen in Breitnau/Hinterzarten, die niet helemaal begrepen dat ik er slechts een beetje van wilde proeven als voorgerecht, dus serveerden ze me mijn enorme bord met asperges gelijk met twee flinke boterhammen met ham en vanalles erbij…. een klein beetje teveel dus… vandaar het dieet :)

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Yummy Yogurteis & Blissful Berries

Als je in het Zwarte Woud rond rijdt, zul je vast en zeker een aantal enorme melkwagens voorbij zien denderen. De Duitsers zijn namelijk net als ons ook erg verzot op zuivelproducten! Natuurlijk is het niet alleen melk, maar ook yoghurt dat ze hier maken. Of nog beter: yoghurtijs *ahh!*

Combineer je ijsje eens met verse bessen uit de omgeving, of heerlijke pannenkoeken, dan ben je pas echt klaar voor de dag!

WAAR TE PROEVEN: We verwenden onszelf bij Hofgut Sternen in Breitnau/Hinterzarten voordat we het nabijgelegen ravijn gingen bewandelen. Zoals het hoort.

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Perfecte Pellkartoffeln mit Quark

Dit gerecht zal er misschien niet als mooiste uitzien, maar als je het eenmaal geproefd hebt, vind je het vast heerlijk! De Pellkartoffeln zijn een beetje als pofaardappelen en de Quark is een verse kaas gemaakt van verwarmde zure melk. Nou ja, gewoon kwark zoals wij dat kennen dus. Het is erg licht in de caloriën en smaak.

Ze serveren de quark bij brood of groenten als voorgerecht of zelfs een licht ontbijt. Je kunt het ook als een soort yogurt eten en er fruit of muesli op doen.

WAAR TE PROEVEN: Ik had een wel heel traditionele versie van dit gerecht in het openluchtmuseum Vogtsbaurenhof in Gutach. Op enkele dagen in de week staat een mevrouw hier op de klassieke manier te koken en gebruikt ze kruiden uit haar eigen moestuin om wat geheime elementen aan de kwark toe te voegen. Lekker!

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Beminde Brezels

Hoewel ik ze altijd gewoon als Pretzels kende, blijkt het echte woord voor deze smakelijk, gezouten brood kronkel-dingen dus Brezel te zijn. Maar hoe je het ook noemt, ik vind ze HEERLIJK en probeer er altijd ten minste een te eten als ik in Duitsland ben.

Hoewel je tegenwoordig overal brezels in Duisland kunt krijgen, zijn ze toch echt het meest bekend in de staten Beieren en Baden-Württemberg. Mazzel voor mij dus!

Ze worden echt gebakken om op dezelfde dag op te eten en je kunt ze ook vinden met boter ertussen (Butterbrezel) of zelfs geserveerd met plakken vleeswaren of kaas.

WAAR TE PROEVEN: Ik haalde er eentje gelijk op het vliegveld in Basel, maar at hem zo snel op dat ik vergat er een foto van de nemen *gulp*, maar deze hier beneden is bij Hausbrauerei Feierling in Freiburg, waar je hem kunt eten zoals hij bedoeld is: met een goed glas bier erbij.

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Geweldige Grillwurst

Als je in Freiburg bent, moet je echt even deze lokale specialiteit genaamd de ‘Lange Rote’ proeven. Het is een gegrilde 35-centimeter lange pittige worst, gemaakt van fijn varkensvlees en bacon, in tweeën gevouwen (als je er niet als toerist uit wilt zien eet je hem zonder vouw zegt men hier) en in een broodje met uien (hoewel ook hier sommigen zeggen dat dat er niet op hoort), ketchup en mosterd er bovenop.

Ze noemen het de ‘Koning van de Worsten’ in Freiburg en het is ook zeker een heerlijke snack. Zonder de huid die je normaal op worsten vind, is het erg gemakkelijk te eten en heeft hij een speciale goud-gele kleur.

WAAR TE PROEVEN: Voor 2,50 Euro op de Münsterplatz, Freiburg, Gewoon ‘ein Lange Rote, bitte!’ roepen – er zal wel een rij staan waarschijnlijk!

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Fantastische Flammkuchen

Nog zo’n heerlijke Zuid-Duitse maaltijd is de Flammkuchen en ook deze komen in verschillende maten en vormen. Het is in principe niets meer dan brooddeeg dat heel dun in de vorm van een rechthoek (traditioneel) of cirkel is uitgerold, daarna met kaas of crème fraîche bedekt, dun gesneden uien en spekjes… maar het is zooooon lekker als een middagsnack of als lunch!

Volgens de geschiedenis komt dit gerecht van boeren die een keer per week of om de week brood bakten en een flammkuchen bakte om de hitte van hun houtovens te testen. De hitte bakte ze in ongeveer 1-2 minuten, daarbij een aanbrandde rand achterlatend.

WAAR TE PROEVEN: Ik moest er een tijdje op wachten, maar toen ze me eindelijk mijn bestelling kwamen brengen bij de Schwarzbrennerei in Titisee, kon ik er niet méér van genieten. Samen met een Johannisbeersaft (zwarte bessen sap), had ik een heerlijke lunch! (en check ook zeker even hun schattige interieur)

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Lekkere Linzertorte

Ok, deze cake komt eigenlijk oorspronkelijk uit Oostenrijk (vernoemd naar de stad Linz), maar wordt in Duitsland regelmatig geserveerd, vooral rond de Kerst. De torte is gemaakt van zachte, korrelig deeg gevuld met amandelen, frambozen jam en -natuurlijk- wat frambozen likeur. Afgetopt met poedersuiker

Cool feitje: de Linzertorte is waarschijnlijk de oudste cake in de wereld!

WAAR TE PROEVEN: Ik had een puntje van de torte in de kleine kiosk naast de speeltuin van het openluchtmuseum Vogtsbaurenhof in Gutach. Maar ik weet zeker dat ze het op heel veel andere plekken in het Zwarte Woud serveren!

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Natuurlijk heb ik de beste taart van allemaal tot het einde bewaard:

Kissable Kirschtorte

Als er iets een echt symbool van de keuken van het Zwarte Woud is, dan is het zeker de Schwarzwalder Kirschtorte: lagen van chocolade cake volgesmeerd met slagroom en kersen tussen elke laag. De taart wordt daarna versierd met nog meer slagroom (want je kunt daar natuurlijk nooit genoeg van hebben, toch?), maraschino kersen en chocolade schaafsels.

Wat ik niet wist was dat er een geheim ingrediënt in de taart zat: Kirch. Of beter bekend als “een-heldere-likeur-waardoor-je-ongeschikt-raakt-om-nog-te-rijden-nadat-je-slechts-een-punt-hebt-gegeten-van-deze-taart”. Want ja, de mensen hier in het Zwarte Woud gieten het liefst de hele taart vol, tot hij van de likeur druipt (niet eens overdreven!)

WAAR TE PROEVEN Ik had een erg, erg lekkere punt van de taart (lees: erg, erg vol met likeur) bij de Dorotheenhütte in Wolfach. Maarja, die had ik dan ook zelf gemaakt.

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

Traditional German Food in the Black Forest: Mouth-Watering Photos | The Travel Tester

The Travel Tester Blog: Practical

Wil je meer weten over (traditioneel) eten in Duitsland? Kijk dan zeker even op de Social Wall van de #JoinGermanTradition Campagne.
Black Forest Hotel Suggesties: Ik had een prettig verblijf bij de volgende hotels tijdens mijn verblijf in Duitsland:

Park Hotel Post
Eisenbahnstraße 35/37, 79098 Freiburg
Telefoon: +49 (0)761 385480
Website: www.park-hotel-post.de

Hofgut Sternen
Höllsteig 76, 79874 Breitnau/Hinterzarten
Telefoon: +49 (0) 7652 9010
Website: www.hofgut-sternen.de

Gasthof Hotel zum Hecht
Hauptstraße 51, 77709 Wolfach
Telefoon:+49 7834 538
Website: www.hecht-wolfach.de

Disclaimer: I was uitgenodigd door het Duits Verkeersbureau als onderdeel van de #JoinGermanTradition Blog Trip in Juni 2015, gecreëerd en uitgevoerd door iambassador in samenwerking met het Duits Verkeersbureau Nederland.Alle foto’s en ervaringen in deze post zijn, zoals altijd 100% van mijzelf.

The Travel Tester Blog: Now it's your turn!

Welke van deze gerechten is jouw favoriet? Heb je er al een geprobeerd? Laat het me hier beneden weten!

En bedankt voor het delen van dit artikel op Pinterest:

Traditioneel Duits Eten in het Zwarte Woud: Foto's om bij te Watertanden | The Travel Tester[:]

Written By
More from Nienke Krook Read More

4 Comments

    • Ha Stef, haha, that is great to read (not that I made you homesick of course, but that you like the post) When we lived in Australia, there was a German girl who would always have her mother send over some sort of dry version of spätzle? Not sure how that would taste, but it was as close to home as she could get, so she was happy with it :D It’s the funniest things we miss from home sometimes, right? Safe travels!

  • Super interesting article Nienke! These all look so tasty, my mouth was watering across every picture I came upon. Actually after seeing the gatineau cake and you describing it I thought “hey! must be ‘Black Forest Cake'” (made sense in my head). I went and looked it up but was disappointed to hear Black Forest Cakes do not originate from Germany (source: but rather the liquor they use in the cake! Random fact of the day haha.
    Thanks for all the delicious info :)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge