[:en]An Idiot’s Guide to London Transport [Part 1] London Underground[:nl]An Idiot’s Guide tot Vervoer in London [Deel 1] De Londen Underground[:]

[:en]Every time I visit a new country, I think of the following quote by author Bill Bryson:

“I can’t think of anything that excites a greater sense of childlike wonder than to be in a country where you are ignorant of almost everything. Suddenly you are five years old again. You can’t read anything, you have only the most rudimentary sense of how things work, you can’t even reliably cross a street without endangering your life. Your whole existence becomes a series of interesting guesses.” ― Bill Bryson in ‘Neither Here nor There: Travels in Europe’

Especially when you don’t just visit a place, but actually spend some time living there, you will find out that you really have learn so many thing over again. Things that you never realized were so different in another country, even if the culture seems very similar to your own.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

 

Here in the UK, I experience this feeling the most when it comes to finding my way through the supermarket. Where on earth do these Brits keep their hagelslag, ontbijtkoek and Johma Kip-Kerrie Salade? No?

Surely there is a whole section of isles that only becomes available to customers after they’ve visited over a certain amount of times. Or if they say a magic word. Or after they have bought Marmite for the first time. Who knows? But that’s not what we’re talking about today and I’ll keep that first world problem for later.

Today we’re talking about that one other thing that you just can’t get right the first time abroad: Public Transport. Because boy, are there a whole set of (unspoken) rules that go along with that -especially when it comes to the London Underground, also called the London Tube, so let’s start by tackling this beast.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

 

London Transport: Myths of the London Underground

The Tube seems to be the least scary of all of London’s Transport options and is therefore pretty popular, but don’t let it trick you: even when you ‘get it’, you can still totally do it all wrong. Let me go through some of the main points you should be aware of when choosing this type of transport.

The Tube during Rush Hour

It’s important to know that during rush hours, you might want to avoid getting on this hot, smelly moving iron piece of horror. But if you happen to find yourself on it for some reason, do as the locals do to blend in: avoid conversation or even eye contact at all costs.

Look as annoyed as you can, while you dangle on one arm from the monkey bars at the ceiling of the carriage, while reading the free METRO (morning) or Evening Standard (eh, evening) and bending your neck in about 90 degrees to make sure your head doesn’t get chopped of by the rapidly closing doors.

The Tube for Tall People

If you’re taller than 1m60 (5f2″) and especially if you’re on the Picadilly Line (the tunnels on this part are smaller, so even less space) you need to make sure you move inside far enough. This also is a good idea if you’re trying to avoid as many armpits as you can.  And you definitely want to try avoiding that.

The Tube and Musical Chairs

Moving into the carriage (in between the few chosen ones living in a remote enough part of the city to actually find a seat when they get in) is always a good idea, because at some popular stops, a lot of people get out and you avoid getting bashed -and might even find a seat yourself.

Extra note: People who do not walk into the seating area, but block it by keeping close to the exit doors risk being killed by furious lasers shooting from eyes of the people behind you. A big no-no.

Extra Extra Note: if you can choose, don’t take the seat right next to the exit (next to the glass wall) because there are always ladies with a so called ‘baby on board’ button (yes, this is for real) that are released into the carriages at certain times to make you stand up for them.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

Basically: don’t talk, don’t laugh, don’t breathe… and you’ll be fine!

Image Source: FreeImages.com/brendan gogarty

 

The Magic “Oyster Card”

The easiest way to use the Tube is to not get an overpriced day pass, but to buy an ‘Oyster Card’. This is a plastic card that you can keep topping up (click ‘pay as you go’ on the machines at the station or do it at the counter. The broader machines accept cash, the rest only card and not all cards seem to work on it). Every time you go on the Tube, you ‘check in’ before you go through the gates on the yellow pad right from where you are walking, and you have to ‘check out’ again as well. You get money back when you return the card at the end of your trip!

With the Oyster, you can also go all the way to Heathrow Airport, no special ticket needed (you do for some other airport trains, will share more in a separate blog on that).

Oysters also work on buses (only check-in, no check-out needed), DLR (Docklands Light Rail -a train with no driver, scary as shit), Overground, some ferries you’ll never use and the Emirates Air Line that you only use in your first week of sightseeing. For everything goes that Oyster is always cheaper than buying a single ticket.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

 

London Tube Stations: from Cockfosters to Morden

The London metro is not only handy for getting to places you need to go, it’s also a great way to discover places you probably never even heard of. Just two rules with this:

  1. You are not supposed to laugh about the station name ‘Cockfosters’ (it’s the end of the Picadilly line and therefore always mentioned) and Morden isn’t the same as Mordor, although technically it’s so far and ominous, that it really actually is the same.
  2. Never make friends with anyone further than zone 3. They will bankrupt you and it’s just too bloody far to get to them. Ain’t nobody got time for that.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

 

Ok, what else is important (or just fun) to know about London Underground stations? Well, perhaps the following:

Knowing Where The BLEEP You Are
Start by always bringing one of the free London tube maps that you can pick up on any station, because they are the only ones that actually give you an overview of every line. The one in the tube itself only shows you the section you’re on and you’ll be surely doomed. Ask anyone on a train how to get from place A to place B and they won’t have a clue.

Getting from one Station to the Other

When you need to transfer, no need to check in/out (only check-out at the last station or when you transfer to the DLR or Overground), but follow the coloured directions on the top of the walls (sometimes on signs) right when you get off the train. Sometimes, you do have to walk along the entire platform to find a small gap in the wall that leads to a tunnel, 5 flights of stairs and 3 more tunnels, but don’t give up, you’re almost  there, keep following the yellow (or red or blue or …) Brick road Dorothy! Unless you’ve accidentally hit platform 9 3/4 or enter a giant wooden wardrobe, you’ll pretty much end up where you actually need to be.

When given the option of a lift or stairs, always take the lift, unless you’re an iron man/woman.

Expert Tip: Don’t follow the signs telling you where to transfer. They take you around the moon and back for nothing. There are always secret passageways that can get you to another platform in far less time. But they don’t want you to know about that, so keep looking and you’ll find them! Especially true at Kings Cross Station.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

More like waaaaaaaaaay out (but I guess that didn’t fit the sign)

 

Proper Use of Escalators

Easy one: stand on the right if you stand still, or get screamed at.

Old People and the London Underground

You normally won’t see a whole lot of elderly people in the tube, as they usually cannot find of don’t survive getting to the platforms through the maze of tunnels you have to walk through and get lost underground forever. I believe they’re collected at the end of the day and are put onto bicycles to generate power for the entire city.

Getting Out of the Station

Every station has multiple exits. Important to know when you’re supposed meet someone there, otherwise don’t give yourself an headache figuring it out, just take any and maybe cross an extra road once you get above ground. All roads lead to Rome. Or at least to Picadilly Circus.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

Picadilly Circus, otherwise known as the Black Hole, as I never get phone reception here and always need to plan ahead and screenshot my Google maps when looking for a specific street here!

 

 

And don’t forget:
London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

Credit: FreeImages.com/Stuart Skelton
 

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Practical
Hope you’ve found my tips helpful so far, if not, check out the following websites for more proper tips:

TFL journey planning: tfl.gov.uk/plan-a-journey

London Transport Apps: There are a couple of apps around that are pretty helpful for finding your way around London, this is the best: CityMapper

London Tube Map: tfl.gov.uk/maps/track/tube

 

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Inspirational

Want tips on where to go in London and the rest of Britain? Check out my Pinterest board:
 

Follow The Travel Tester’s board Things To Do In UK on Pinterest.

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Now it's your turn!

Have you experienced travelling with London transport yet? Did you get it all right or was it complete chaos to you, let me know :)

 

Thank you for sharing this article on Pinterest:

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester[:nl]Elke keer als ik een nieuw land bezoek, denk ik aan de volgende quote van schrijver Bill Bryson:

“I can’t think of anything that excites a greater sense of childlike wonder than to be in a country where you are ignorant of almost everything. Suddenly you are five years old again. You can’t read anything, you have only the most rudimentary sense of how things work, you can’t even reliably cross a street without endangering your life. Your whole existence becomes a series of interesting guesses.” ― Bill Bryson in ‘Neither Here nor There: Travels in Europe’

Vooral als je niet alleen een plaats alleen maar bezoekt, maar er ook wat tijd wonend en werkend doorbrengt, zul je erachter komen dat je sommige dingen echt even opnieuw moet leren. Dingen waarvan je nooit wist dat ze zo anders waren in een ander land, zelfs als de cultuur zo dichtbij die van jou lijkt te staan.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

 

Hier in Engeland had ik dat gevoel het meest als ik mijn weg door de supermarkt probeer te vinden. Waar bewaren die Britten in hemelsnaam hun hagelslag, ontbijtkoek en Johma Kip-Kerrie Salade? Nee?

Er is waarschijnlijk een hele sectie met schappen die pas beschikbaar komen voor bezoekers als ze de winkel een bepaald aantal keer bezocht hebben. Of als ze een magisch woord zeggen. Of nadat ze voor de eerste keer Marmite gekocht hebben. Wie zal het weten? Maar daar gaan we het vandaag niet over hebben en dus zal ik dit eerste wereld probleem voor later bewaren.

Vandaag gaan het het hebben over dat ándere dingen dat je de eerste keer ook niet helemaal goed onder de knie kan krijgen: Openbaar Vervoer. Wat man oh man, wat zijn daar een hele rits aan (onuitgesproken) regels die daar bij komen kijken -zeker als je het hebt over de Londen Underground, ook wel “The Tube” genaamd. Dus laten we beginnen met het temmen van dit beest, ok?

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

 

Vervoer in Londen: Mythen van de London Underground

De Tube lijkt voor bezoekers altijd het minst eng te zijn uit de hele reeks van Londen’s vervoersopties, en is daarom vrij populair. Maar laat je niet in de maling nemen: zelfs als je het ‘doorhebt’, kan je het nog steeds allemaal verkeerd doen. Laat ik maar eens samen met je door wat puntjes lopen die je zeker even van me moet aannemen als je voor dit vervoerstype kiest.

De Tube tijdens de Spits

Het is belangrijk om te weten dat tijdens spitsuur je om te beginnen wil proberen helemaal niet met deze hete, stinkende bewegende ijzeren horror te reizen. Maar mocht je om de een of andere duistere reden er toch voor kiezen dit te doen, pas je dan aan de locals aan om niet teveel op te vallen: praat met niemand en vermijd oogcontact zoveel mogelijk.

Kijk vervolgens redelijk verveeld, terwijl je aan één arm aan de handgrepen boven je hangt, terwijl je de gratis METRO (ochtend) of Evening Standard (eh, avond dus) en je je nek in ongeveer 90 graden buigt om er zeker van te zijn dat je kop er niet wordt afgeslagen door de snel sluitende deuren.

De Tube voor Lange Mensen

Als je langer dan 1m 60 bent, en zeker als je je in de Picadilly Lijn bevindt (die tunnel is kleiner en dus nog minder ruimte voor je lange lijf), moet je ver genoeg de wagon in gaan. Dit is sowieso een goed idee als je zoveel mogelijk oksels wilt voorkomen. En dat is zeker iets dat je wilt vermijden.

De Tube en de Stoelendans

Het is altijd slim om zo ver mogelijk de treinwagon in te lopen en te gaan staan tussen het handje mensen dat ver genoeg buiten het centrum woont om ook daadwerkelijk te kunnen zitten, want bij de meest populaire haltes zullen er veel mensen zich naar buiten willen dringen en dan voorkom je zoveel mogelijk geduw. En met een beetje geluk en een scherp oog vind je zelf misschien wel een plekje! Snel!

Extra aantekening: mensen die niet naar het zitgedeelte doorlopen en dus de uitgangen blokkeren door te dicht bij de uitgang te blijven staan, riskeren door de mensen achter hun met lasers uit de ogen te worden omgesmolten. Een grote no-no dus.

Extra Extra aantekening: Als je kunt kiezen, ga dan niet vlak naast de uitgang zitten (met die glazen plaat naast je), want er worden op gezette tijden vrouwen met een button waarop ‘baby on board’ staat (echt waar) losgelaten waar je vervolgens voor op moet staan..

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

Samenvattend: niet praten, niet lachen, niet ademen…. en dan komt alles goed!

Bron Foto: FreeImages.com/brendan gogarty

 

De Magische “Oyster Card”

De makkelijkste manier om de Tube te gebruiken is niet om een te dure dagpas te kopen, maar een ‘Oyster Card’. Dit is een plastic kaartje waar je steeds geld op kan zetten (klik op ‘pay as you go’ op de machines bij het station of zoek naar een balie. De brede machines kan contant in, de rest is bankpas en niet alle passen werken daarin) Elke keer als je nu met de metro wilt, kun je makkelijk inchecken als je door de poortjes gaat (gele vlak zit aan de rechterkant van waar je inloopt) en natuurlijk ook weer uitchecken als je het station weer verlaat. Je krijgt geld terug als je je Oyster aan het eind van je reis weer inlevert!

Met de Oyster kun je helemaal naar Heathrow reizen zonder speciaal kaartje (wat voor de meeste andere vliegvelden wel moet, meer daarover later in een aparte blog).

Oysters werken ook in de bussen (alleen inchecken, niet uitchecken) DLR (Docklands Light Rail -een trein zonder chauffeur, scary as shit), Overground, sommige veerboten die je nooit gebruikt en de Emirates Air Line die je alleen in je eerste week sightseeing misschien 1x gebruikt. Verder geld dat de Oyster altijd goedkoper is dan een los kaartje te moeten kopen.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

 

Londen Tube Stations: van Cockfosters tot Morden

De Londense metro is niet alleen handig om naar plaatsen te reizen waar je ook daadwerkelijk heen wilt, maar het is ook een leuke manier om plekken te ontdekken waar je waarschijnlijk nog nooit van gehoord hebt. Er zijn hier alleen 2 ongeschreven regels bij::

  1. Je mag niet lachen om de stationsnaam ‘Cockfosters’ (die is aan het eind van de Picadilly lijn en wordt daarom altijd opgenoemd) en Morden is niet hetzelfde als Mordor, maar technisch gesproken is het ook zo ver en onheilspellend dat het toch eigenlijk een beetje hetzelfde is.
  2. Maak nooit vrienden met mensen die buiten zone 3 wonen. Ze zullen je bankroet maken en het is gewoon veel te ver allemaal. Ain’t nobody got time for that.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

 

Ok, wat is er nog meer belangrijk (of gewoon leuk) om te weten over de Londen Underground stations? Nou, misschien het volgende:

Weten waar de BLEEP je bent
Begin bij het altijd meenemen van een van de gratis Londen metrokaarten die je op elk station kunt vinden, want dit zijn de enige kaarten (behalve die op de perrons) waar je echt een goed overzicht van alle lijnen krijgt. Die in de metro zelf laat alleen maar de lijn waar je opzit zien en op welke lijnen je kunt overstappen, gegarandeerd verdoemt dus. Vraag iemand in de trein hoe je van plek A naar plek B komt en ze zullen ook geen flauw idee hebben.

Van een station naar een ander komen

Als je ergens moet overstappen, hoef je niet opnieuw in en uit te checken (alleen bij het verlaten van het laatste station, of als je overstapt op de Overground of DLR), maar volg gewoon de gekleurde richtingaanwijzers die je bovenop de muren ziet (soms op bordjes) gelijk zodra je uit de trein stapt. Soms moet je langs het hele perron lopen om een klein gat in de muur te vinden die naar een tunnel, 5 trappen en nog 3 andere tunnels leidt, maar geef het niet op, want je bent er bijna. Blijf de yellow (of red of blue of …) brick road volgen Dorothy! Behalve als je per ongeluk platform 9 3/4 of een grote houten kledingkast binnengaat, zul je vrijwel altijd uitkomen waar je ook echt wilt zijn.

Als je de optie krijgt tussen een lift of trappen, neem dan altijd de lift, behalve als je een iron man/woman bent.

Expert Tip: Volg juist niet de bordjes die je vertellen waar je moet overstappen. Die sturen je naar de maan en terug voor niets namelijk. Er zijn altijd geheime doorgangen die je van het ene naar het andere perron brengen in veel minder tijd. Maar dat willen ze je niet laten weten natuurlijk, dus goed zoeken en dan zul je het vinden, vooral zo op Kings Cross Station.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

Meer waaaaaaaaaay out (maar ik denk dat dat niet op het bordje paste)

 

Juist gebruik van de roltrappen

Makkelijk: Sta aan de rechterkant als je niet loopt of ze gaan tegen je schreeuwen.

Ouden mensen en de London Underground

Je ziet normaal gesproken niet echt veel oude mensen in de metro in Londen, omdat ze of het perron niet kunnen vinden of het gewoon niet overleven om door zo’n doolhof van tunnels te lopen en raken meestal voor altijd ondergronds verdwaald. Ik denk dat ze aan het eind van de dag verzameld worden en op fietsen gezet om stroom voor de hele stad bij elkaar te trappen.

Het station weer verlaten

Elk station heeft verschillende uitgangen, handig om te weten als je met iemand op een bepaalde plek hebt afgesproken, maar anders zou ik me hier niet teveel in verdiepen en er gewoon eentje kiezen en dan bij het bovenkomen dan maar een keertje extra oversteken. Alle wegen leiden immers naar Rome. Of in ieder geval naar Picadilly Circus.

 

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

Picadilly Circus, of voor mij beter bekend als the Black Hole, omdat ik hier nooit bereik op mijn telefoon heb en ik dus thuis al moet plannen en screenshots van mijn Google maps moet maken als ik een specifieke straat hier in de buurt zoek!

 

 

En natuurlijk niet vergeten:
London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester

Credit: FreeImages.com/Stuart Skelton
 

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Practical
Ik hoop natuurlijk dat je tussen mijn flauwekul wat handig tips gevonden hebt, maar als dit niet zo is zijn hier de officiële websites voor meer hulp:

TFL reisplanner: tfl.gov.uk/plan-a-journey

Londen Vervoers Apps: Er zijn een aantal apps die best handig zijn om je weg rond Londen te vinden, dit is de beste: CityMapper

London Tube Kaart: tfl.gov.uk/maps/track/tube

 

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Inspirational

Wil je meer tips over wat je in en rondom Londen en de rest van Engeland kunt doen? Check dan mijn Pinterest bord:
Follow The Travel Tester’s board Things To Do In UK on Pinterest.

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Now it's your turn!

Heb jij al eens het Openbaar Vervoer in Londen ervaren? Ging het goed of was het een grote chaos voor jou? Laat het ons weten! :)

 

Bedankt voor het delen van dit artikel op Pinterest:

London Transport Tips Part 1: Using the London Underground as a Local | The Travel Tester[:]

Written By
More from Nienke Krook

Spotting Panda’s at Ueno ZOO Tokyo

I ate at McDonald. I thought I'd get that out of the way...
Read More

4 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge