Food Photography Tips For TravellersFood Photography Tips For Travellers

This May, I’d like to focus on food photography tips. Every month, I show you some of my own travel photos. For inspiration, but also to give you some quick tips on how to improve your own travel photography. This May, I’d like to focus on food photography tips. Every month, I show you some of my own travel photos. For inspiration, but also to give you some quick tips on how to improve your own travel photography.

Travel Fotography Tip - Food  

Finding food worth photographing

I love taking pictures of food, but sometimes my travel partners get a bit crazy with me hanging over the plate with a camera – before they can eat. Most of the time, I try to take a picture in a restaurant and it just doesn’t work out. Too dark, too grainy, to boring a shot… And I never look at them again. So I try to stop taking plain platter shots and look for the more interesting shots around me. Luckily, there are plenty of opportunities to take a great food shot. Without annoying your friends!  

Basic food photography tips

There are a few things to keep in mind before clicking away that really helps you create a better food shot, such as light and composition. But the most important question I think you should be asking yourself is: ‘Does it look tasty?’ Have a look at your photos and think about what would make someone want to eat the food you just photographed. Let the colours pop and find food that is exciting and delicious!  

  1. Try and keep the picture as simple as possible. Less is more, especially when it comes to food photography. A plate with too much going on will distract the viewer. Use one or two extra elements if you like, such as a glass, flower or napkin.
  2. Use the best light available Every photographer knows that natural daylight tends to be the most flattering for any subject, and that includes food. Take a picture outside, or by a window to get plenty of natural light.
  3. Think about the composition of the image. A shot directly from above the plate is generally speaking not a good idea. Most of the time, you’ll get a much better shot by shooting from down close to plate level, or slightly above it. Also experiment with getting up close, or leaving parts of the plate out of the composition.
  4. Don’t forget the background. Try to use a shallow depth of field to increase drama (and make the best of the available light) and look for things in the background that don’t distract – or add something to the story.
  5. Look for local food I’d like to suggest you look for food that is characteristic to the town/country you’re in. Have a look at a local market, see what people eat on a festival or find traditional ways of cooking (such as the ‘Lovo’, or earth oven cooking in Fiji – see image below).

  Have a look at some of the food photo’s I’ve made during my trips:   Food & Travel Photography

Momo’s in Patan, Nepal

 

Food Photography Tips Tropical Fruit Ice Cream in Daintree, QLD, Australia

 

Food Photography Sushi in Tokyo, Japan

 

Food Photography Tip Waffles on Tasmania, Australia

 

Photographing Food ‘Lovo’ on Vorovoro Island, Fiji

 

More food photography tips from the experts

There are some fantastic resources out there that can help you improve your photos drastically. Here are my favourite travel photo tips relating to food photography:

 

Food photography inspiration

I’ve found a couple of sites that give you some great inspiration about topics to shoot while travelling, related to food. Most of these sites also give you great food photography tips:

 

Check out my new travel photo tips every month, and look for more of my travel photos on Instagram

Travel Fotography Tip - Food

 

Finding food worth photographing

I love taking pictures of food, but sometimes my travel partners get a bit crazy with me hanging over the plate with a camera – before they can eat. Most of the time, I try to take a picture in a restaurant and it just doesn’t work out. Too dark, too grainy, to boring a shot… And I never look at them again.

So I try to stop taking plain platter shots and look for the more interesting shots around me. Luckily, there are plenty of opportunities to take a great food shot. Without annoying your friends!

 

Basic food photography tips

There are a few things to keep in mind before clicking away that really helps you create a better food shot, such as light and composition. But the most important question I think you should be asking yourself is: ‘Does it look tasty?’ Have a look at your photos and think about what would make someone want to eat the food you just photographed. Let the colours pop and find food that is exciting and delicious!

 

  1. Try and keep the picture as simple as possible.
    Less is more, especially when it comes to food photography. A plate with too much going on will distract the viewer. Use one or two extra elements if you like, such as a glass, flower or napkin.
  2. Use the best light available
    Every photographer knows that natural daylight tends to be the most flattering for any subject, and that includes food. Take a picture outside, or by a window to get plenty of natural light.
  3. Think about the composition of the image.
    A shot directly from above the plate is generally speaking not a good idea. Most of the time, you’ll get a much better shot by shooting from down close to plate level, or slightly above it. Also experiment with getting up close, or leaving parts of the plate out of the composition.
  4. Don’t forget the background.
    Try to use a shallow depth of field to increase drama (and make the best of the available light) and look for things in the background that don’t distract – or add something to the story.
  5. Look for local food
    I’d like to suggest you look for food that is characteristic to the town/country you’re in. Have a look at a local market, see what people eat on a festival or find traditional ways of cooking (such as the ‘Lovo’, or earth oven cooking in Fiji – see image below).

 

Have a look at some of the food photo’s I’ve made during my trips:

 

Food & Travel Photography

Momo’s in Patan, Nepal

 

Food Photography Tips
Tropical Fruit Ice Cream in Daintree, QLD, Australia

 

Food Photography
Sushi in Tokyo, Japan

 

Food Photography Tip
Waffles on Tasmania, Australia

 

Photographing Food
‘Lovo’ on Vorovoro Island, Fiji

 

More food photography tips from the experts

There are some fantastic resources out there that can help you improve your photos drastically. Here are my favourite travel photo tips relating to food photography:

 

Food photography inspiration

I’ve found a couple of sites that give you some great inspiration about topics to shoot while travelling, related to food. Most of these sites also give you great food photography tips:

 

Check out my new travel photo tips every month, and look for more of my travel photos on Instagram

Written By
More from Nienke Krook

[:en]Jason Womack Inspirational Productivity Quotes & Book Review[:]

[:en]Last Christmas, I got the productivity book "Your Best Just Got Better"...
Read More

3 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge