[:en]Blogging as a Business – TBU Nantes Conference Recap[:nl]Bloggen als een Business – TBU Nantes Conferentie Samenvatting[:]

[:en]I spend the last week in Nantes, France, to attend the TBU (Travel Blogging Unite) blogging conference to speak about working with Pinterest and also to learn from my colleagues about blogging as a business and becoming more professional in doing that.

The quality of the sessions was very high and the rush of excitement for getting started on lots of new projects was something I definitely needed since my ‘blogging dip‘ earlier this month. It’s great to learn from others and keep bringing up the importance of seeing your blog as a business and acting as a professional.

The hashtag for this event was #TBUNTE

 

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

 

These are some of the session I attended. Notes and Tweets below:

  • Keynote: Blogging as a Business: How to make a Business out of your Passion for Travel
  • Panel: Is Everything Really ‘Awesome’ & ‘Amazing’ with Blogger Content?
  • Panel: Case Studies & Advice from Outside of Travel Blogging
  • Panel: The Future of Travel Blogging
  • Workshop: Successful Commercial Relationships: Learning From Family and Foodie Bloggers
  • Workshop: Create a Winning Strategy with Pinterest
  • Workshop: A Fresh Approach to your Newsletter
  • Workshop: PR Think Thank for Bloggers: Developing Campaign Strategies That Work
  • Workshop: Tell Stories People Want To Read
  • Workshop: Successful Advertising and Partnerships
  • Closing Panel: Blogging as a Business

 

Below you can find some of the biggest aha-moments and eye-openers that I had during the conference. I hope you find them useful too!

 

Blogging as a Business: How to make a Business out of your Passion for Travel

Tine Thygesen (@Everplaces@tahitahi)

  • Mobile is changing travel: 52% of consumers used a mobile device (48% laptop) to book travel and 51% use apps in a destination (94% research on things to do, 75% search for restaurants and 80% for maps and directions)
  • Maps are now a direct source for contextual content and info for consumers
  • You are the horse, not the hero. Entrepreneurism is not about you, it’s about finding out what the big issue for your audience and how you can help them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Is Everything Really ‘Awesome’ & ‘Amazing’ with Blogger Content?

Moderator: Alastair McKenzie (@alastairmck). Panel: Sara Whines (@spwhines / @fourbgb), Bernice Windley (@bigbustours) and Sarah Lee (@LiveShareTravel)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Case Studies & Advice from Outside of Travel Blogging

Moderator: Oliver Gradwell (@tbloggersunite). Panel: Mark Richards (@BestDadICanBe ), Robert McIntosh (@thirstforwine ) and Sally Whittle (@swhittle)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

The Future of Travel Blogging

Moderator: Alastair McKenzie. Panel: Mike Briggs (@Caliberi), Angelika Schwaff (@RB_Kollektiv), Erik van Erp (@travelbloggerNL ) and Chris Pitt (@careforthewild)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Successful Commercial Relationships: Learning From Family and Foodie Bloggers

Sally Whittle (@swhittle)

 

  • Most family, food and lifestyle bloggers run a second (or even 3rd/4th) website to generate more income.
  • Accepted fees for sponsored content go anywhere from 20 to 200 pounds and on average these bloggers have about 10 to 15.000 followers a month. These numbers are quite low in comparison to travel bloggers, but some of these bloggers manage to earn over 20.000 pounds per year as they almost all monotize in one way or the other.
  • It seems that family bloggers don’t care so much for Google penalties, as they earn enough money on the side to be able to stay at home with their kids and that’s worth more for them. They do however care very much about being honest to their audience and will always disclose sponsored/paid content.
  • Getting paid for your blog is all about your mindset.
  • When travelling, look at all components of your trip (from suitcase to airport lounge to hotel, etc.), then ask yourself: “How can I monotize this?”
  • Also think about creating content for the brands your work with. Do they need photos? A video for their website? Be entrepreneurial.
  • Have a good media pack, advertiser pack and a good about page. Use screenshots of testimonials you’ve received.

 
 

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

 
 
 

Create a Winning Strategy with Pinterest

Nienke Krook (@thetraveltester – that’s me!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

-because of your first presentation ever all you really need is 1 blurry photo, right?-

 
 
 

A Fresh Approach to your Newsletter

Leyla Giray Alynak (@womenontheroad)

 

  • Are you using your list to inform or to sell?
  • Your purpose is getting readers to open your email and keeping them on your ezine until they take the action you want them to take
  • Use a freebie (something your readers need!) to get people to sign up for your list and then link through to a
  • resource page (report, ebook, download, discount, etc.)
  • Dual opt-in is the norm: 1- thank you page (reminds people to look in their inbox for the confirmation link) 2- confirmation (this is where they click and confirm) 3- confirmation thank you (this is where you thank them for joining and where you provide them with their incentive and where you ask them to join you on social media. Most people waste this readl estate!
  • Write for people who already WANT what you’re offering. And give them more of it. What keeps them awake at night? What hurts them? Take away their pain.
  • Good subject lines: short, controversial, use keywords, use numbers and superlatives , newsworthiness and urgency. Be compelling and don’t try to be cute.
  • Inside your newsletter, you want to add info that is new, links to new posts, teasers, repurposed content, answers to top questions, images with alt tags, videos, sales, power-points.
  • Give people something they want to share
  • A newsletter should always have a CTA (Call to Action): determine your most wanted response!
  • If your list stagnates -rejuvenate it. Check what’s wrong (too promotional, headlines, failing to deliver what readers want, weak cta, technical problems) and fix it. 

     

 

 

 

 
 

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

 
 
 

PR Think Thank for Bloggers: Developing Campaign Strategies That Work

Sara Whines (@spwhines / @fourbgb)

 

  • Content marketing is a marketing technique of creating and distributing valuable, relevant and consistent content to attract and acquire a clearly difined audience – with the objective of driving profitable customer action (The Content Marketing Association)
  • Content marketing confuses marketers, they struggle to prove ROI (return on investment), 28% say that developing a content strategy is a problem, 31% need to improve quality and 78% need improved reporting
  • PR’s are interested in sales(!), brand awareness for new products, content marketing, SEO, specialists and new, updating perspectives and unique and creative campaigns
  • To tap into the PR budgets, you need to build a relationship. Hard sell won’t work! Look at what companies/products might need your help. Meet up and do your research.
  • Questions to ask: who are you trying to reach, what are your marketing/business objectives, how can I help you (although they often don’t know!), what campaigns are you running already
  • Devise a strategy: who are we communicating with, why are we communicating with them, what do we need to say, when and where should we communicate with them and how should we achieve our objectives?
  • Present a compelling case: Presentation, Preparation, Panache (and Pow!). Make it clear why PR’s should work with you with firm business reasons and case studies
  • Professional implementation; formal proposal, KPI’s, be contactable, present yourself as a busines, work together and provide status and end reports 

 

 

 
 

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

 
 
 

Tell Stories People Want To Read

Mark Richards (@BestDadICanBe)

 

  • We absorb more information if it’s in story format
  • Stories allow people to make better sense of the world as we can identify with situations we’d never experience otherwise
  • Stories provoke emotions, so people are engaged witht them
  • Blogging is two stories in one: the overall story and the episode
  • Be consistent in your publishing. It’s called the SUNDAY times, not the ‘when-I-can-be-bothered-to-publish’-Times
  • Know your audience, know who you are writing for (“85% of all my readers are 100% female”)
  • Create a voice and don’t be boring
  • Use characters in your stories
  • Never ever, ever let an idea escape. Write it down right away.
  • “I dont believe writers block exists. Just sit down and after 25 minutes inspiration will come”
  • The power of a good story will overcome the quality of the writing
  • Basic set-up of a story: normal world > inciting incident > hero reacts to it > quest > climax
  • There must be a moment of self doubt for every travel blogger. That moment when you come back home, with no house, no partner or kids and as yourself – was it worth it?
  • What readers really want is practical advice, money saving tips and to ‘get it right’. They only go on a holiday 3 weeks per year and saved up. They want the blogger stopping them from making an mistake
  • A blog post of 600 words takes about 2-3 minutes to read. This seems to work best. But make sure to fill it with links to provide your reader with even more value.

 

 

 
 

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

 
 
 

Successful Advertising and Partnerships

Terry Lee (@LiveShareTravel)

 

  • Making a living out of blogging is not an easy job and we still got some seriousissues to discuss
  • What is it that sets the successful bloggers apart from the unsuccessful bloggers? What makes you so special? what’s your USP (Unique Selling Point)? What will make clients pay you for?
  • Are you a businessman/woman? No? Then Houston, we have a problem
  • BLOGGING IS A BUSINESS
  • You cannot run a succesful business without money.
  • There is no company without a budget. If they do not understand the value bloggers can bring, it’s our job to teach them
  • Never think as bloggers: “we are not worthy, we don’t require payment”. You need to ask for it. Payment is EXPECTED in order for your work and time.
  • When you are out there working for free, you miss the oportunity to get paid
  • A blogtrip is simply part of the marketing campaign, the price of everything combined is never too high. Think of tech bloggers, they always receive (and get to keep) high value products and still get paid on top of that
  • You wouldnt apply for a job and not ask for money, so why do that at blogging?
  • You need at least 3 years worth of finance to start your business up
  • Put a media kit on your website (or provide a contact address for people to getone)
  • Learn negotiation and sales skills as soon as you can
  • Don’t assume ou can go in alone on this. Ask for help and get a mentor
  • Meeting your clients needs will bring success

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

 
 
 

Closing Panel: Blogging as a Business

 

Key Take-Aways

  • If you don’t treat it as a business, it will never be one (Leyla Giray Alynak)
  • I’ve seen a lot of talented bloggers pull out because they couldn’t figure out a way to make enough money from it (Terry Lee)
  • Consistency is the most important thing. As an entrepreneur we have to build a platform to market and promote ourselves to make a business out of it (Renee Lo Iacono)
  • We are so much more than just bloggers: we have a whole skilset that we can offer (Guillarme)
  • I didn’t realize it could be done to make a living out of blogging, we really need to focus more on the HOW now: how to we know what we’re worth, how can we approach companies, etc. (Leyla Giray Alynak)

 

How to Work with PR/Companies

  • Realize that it’s all about the client, not about you. When talking to PR’s, make sure to ask them ‘what are you doing now and what are your aims for the next year(s)?’, then let them know how you can help them acchieve their goals (Terry Lee)
  • Build relationships: pick up the phone, meet and have a conversation with PR’s, etc. (Sarah Lee)
  • Attend networking events, I visit about three of them each week and dress for work every single day (Renee Lo Iacono) 

 

About Pitching

  • The difference between someone that charges 30 and someone that charges 500$ for a post is confidence (Renee Lo Iacono)
  • Blogger think too small. There is usually a budget for a campaign (Sarah Lee)
  • Whether you pitch small (hotel/flight compensated) or big, it takes just as much time to sort it out, so often the small things aren’t even worth the effort (Leyla Giray Alynak)
  • I often find it hard to figure out exactly where my readers are from and pitch that (Leyla) > Tell them: ‘8% of my readers are from your planet’ (Alistair) > an American blogger in Spain had mostly readers from Spain and found it hard to work with American companies, but it turned out that most of them where in fact Americans on exchange, so always survey your readers (Oliver Gradwell)

 

How to go Further

  • Ask yourself: ‘Who am I? What do I really want?’ (Renee Lo Iacono)
  • Think about collaborations, learn from others, don’t make the same mistakes as them and make sure to always fund yourself a few years (Terry Lee)
  • Short Term thinking is the biggest problem with bloggers. You should know what kind of business you are in. And think about networking out of your niche. (Robert McIntosh)
  • Look beyond travel brands to form collaborations with (Sarah Lee)
  • Invest in your business and always be credible (Simon Falvo)

 

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Practical

Check out more handy blogging tips on my Pinterest Board:

 

Follow The Travel Tester | Nienke Krook’s board Blogging Tips on Pinterest.

 
 

The Travel Tester Blog: Now it's your turn!

Did you visit TBU Nantes? What was your biggest learning? And are you seeing blogging as a business yet?

 
 

Thanks for sharing this article on Pinterest:

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

 
 

[dropshadowbox align=”none” effect=”lifted-bottom-right” width=”550px” height=”” background_color=”#d1e4f1″ border_width=”1″ border_color=”#dddddd” ]>Travel Bloggers Essential Toolkit<

How to Start a Blog:

Business Essentials

Social Media Management

^ links above are affiliate links
[/dropshadowbox][:nl]Ik heb de afgelopen week in Nantes, Frankrijk doorgebracht om deel te nemen aan de TBU (Travel Blogging Unite) blog conferentie en te spreken over het werken met Pinterest en ook van mijn collega’s te leren over bloggen als business en daar meer professioneel in te worden.

De kwaliteit van de sessies was erg hoog en het enthousiaste gevoel om te beginnen aan veel nieuwe projecten was iets dat ik echt nodig had sinds mijn ‘blog dipje‘ eerder deze maand. Het was geweldig om te leren van anderen en om het belang van het zien van je blog als bedrijf en je professioneel te gedragen te zien.

De hashtag voor dit evenement was #TBUNTE

 

Bloggen als een Business - TBU Nantes Conferentie Samenvatting

 

Dit waren sommige van de sessie die ik bijwoonde. Aantekeningen en Tweets beneden:

  • Keynote: Blogging as a Business: How to make a Business out of your Passion for Travel
  • Panel: Is Everything Really ‘Awesome’ & ‘Amazing’ with Blogger Content?
  • Panel: Case Studies & Advice from Outside of Travel Blogging
  • Panel: The Future of Travel Blogging
  • Workshop: Successful Commercial Relationships: Learning From Family and Foodie Bloggers
  • Workshop: Create a Winning Strategy with Pinterest
  • Workshop: A Fresh Approach to your Newsletter
  • Workshop: PR Think Thank for Bloggers: Developing Campaign Strategies That Work
  • Workshop: Tell Stories People Want To Read
  • Workshop: Successful Advertising and Partnerships
  • Closing Panel: Blogging as a Business

 

Hier beneden kun je enkele van de grootste aha-momenten en eye-openers vinden die ik tijdens de conferentie had. Ik hoop dat je ze ook nuttig vindt (en dat je het niet erg vind dat ik alle aantekeningen in het Engels gelaten heb vanwege tijdnood. Mocht je iets niet begrijpen vraag het me dan zeker even!)

 

Blogging as a Business: How to make a Business out of your Passion for Travel

Tine Thygesen (@Everplaces@tahitahi)

  • Mobile is changing travel: 52% of consumers used a mobile device (48% laptop) to book travel and 51% use apps in a destination (94% research on things to do, 75% search for restaurants and 80% for maps and directions)
  • Maps are now a direct source for contextual content and info for consumers
  • You are the horse, not the hero. Entrepreneurism is not about you, it’s about finding out what the big issue for your audience and how you can help them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Is Everything Really ‘Awesome’ & ‘Amazing’ with Blogger Content?

Moderator: Alastair McKenzie (@alastairmck). Panel: Sara Whines (@spwhines / @fourbgb), Bernice Windley (@bigbustours) and Sarah Lee (@LiveShareTravel)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Case Studies & Advice from Outside of Travel Blogging

Moderator: Oliver Gradwell (@tbloggersunite). Panel: Mark Richards (@BestDadICanBe ), Robert McIntosh (@thirstforwine ) and Sally Whittle (@swhittle)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

The Future of Travel Blogging

Moderator: Alastair McKenzie. Panel: Mike Briggs (@Caliberi), Angelika Schwaff (@RB_Kollektiv), Erik van Erp (@travelbloggerNL ) and Chris Pitt (@careforthewild)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Successful Commercial Relationships: Learning From Family and Foodie Bloggers

Sally Whittle (@swhittle)

 

  • Most family, food and lifestyle bloggers run a second (or even 3rd/4th) website to generate more income.
  • Accepted fees for sponsored content go anywhere from 20 to 200 pounds and on average these bloggers have about 10 to 15.000 followers a month. These numbers are quite low in comparison to travel bloggers, but some of these bloggers manage to earn over 20.000 pounds per year as they almost all monotize in one way or the other.
  • It seems that family bloggers don’t care so much for Google penalties, as they earn enough money on the side to be able to stay at home with their kids and that’s worth more for them. They do however care very much about being honest to their audience and will always disclose sponsored/paid content.
  • Getting paid for your blog is all about your mindset.
  • When travelling, look at all components of your trip (from suitcase to airport lounge to hotel, etc.), then ask yourself: “How can I monotize this?”
  • Also think about creating content for the brands your work with. Do they need photos? A video for their website? Be entrepreneurial.
  • Have a good media pack, advertiser pack and a good about page. Use screenshots of testimonials you’ve received.

 
 

Bloggen als een Business - TBU Nantes Conferentie Samenvatting

 
 
 

Create a Winning Strategy with Pinterest

Nienke Krook (@thetraveltester – that’s me!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Bloggen als een Business - TBU Nantes Conferentie Samenvatting

-because of your first presentation ever all you really need is 1 blurry photo, right?-

 
 
 

A Fresh Approach to your Newsletter

Leyla Giray Alynak (@womenontheroad)

 

  • Are you using your list to inform or to sell?
  • Your purpose is getting readers to open your email and keeping them on your ezine until they take the action you want them to take
  • Use a freebie (something your readers need!) to get people to sign up for your list and then link through to a
  • resource page (report, ebook, download, discount, etc.)
  • Dual opt-in is the norm: 1- thank you page (reminds people to look in their inbox for the confirmation link) 2- confirmation (this is where they click and confirm) 3- confirmation thank you (this is where you thank them for joining and where you provide them with their incentive and where you ask them to join you on social media. Most people waste this readl estate!
  • Write for people who already WANT what you’re offering. And give them more of it. What keeps them awake at night? What hurts them? Take away their pain.
  • Good subject lines: short, controversial, use keywords, use numbers and superlatives , newsworthiness and urgency. Be compelling and don’t try to be cute.
  • Inside your newsletter, you want to add info that is new, links to new posts, teasers, repurposed content, answers to top questions, images with alt tags, videos, sales, power-points.
  • Give people something they want to share
  • A newsletter should always have a CTA (Call to Action): determine your most wanted response!
  • If your list stagnates -rejuvenate it. Check what’s wrong (too promotional, headlines, failing to deliver what readers want, weak cta, technical problems) and fix it. 

     

 

 

 

 
 

Bloggen als een Business - TBU Nantes Conferentie Samenvatting

 
 
 

PR Think Thank for Bloggers: Developing Campaign Strategies That Work

Sara Whines (@spwhines / @fourbgb)

 

  • Content marketing is a marketing technique of creating and distributing valuable, relevant and consistent content to attract and acquire a clearly difined audience – with the objective of driving profitable customer action (The Content Marketing Association)
  • Content marketing confuses marketers, they struggle to prove ROI (return on investment), 28% say that developing a content strategy is a problem, 31% need to improve quality and 78% need improved reporting
  • PR’s are interested in sales(!), brand awareness for new products, content marketing, SEO, specialists and new, updating perspectives and unique and creative campaigns
  • To tap into the PR budgets, you need to build a relationship. Hard sell won’t work! Look at what companies/products might need your help. Meet up and do your research.
  • Questions to ask: who are you trying to reach, what are your marketing/business objectives, how can I help you (although they often don’t know!), what campaigns are you running already
  • Devise a strategy: who are we communicating with, why are we communicating with them, what do we need to say, when and where should we communicate with them and how should we achieve our objectives?
  • Present a compelling case: Presentation, Preparation, Panache (and Pow!). Make it clear why PR’s should work with you with firm business reasons and case studies
  • Professional implementation; formal proposal, KPI’s, be contactable, present yourself as a busines, work together and provide status and end reports 

 

 

 
 

Bloggen als een Business - TBU Nantes Conferentie Samenvatting

 
 
 

Tell Stories People Want To Read

Mark Richards (@BestDadICanBe)

 

  • We absorb more information if it’s in story format
  • Stories allow people to make better sense of the world as we can identify with situations we’d never experience otherwise
  • Stories provoke emotions, so people are engaged witht them
  • Blogging is two stories in one: the overall story and the episode
  • Be consistent in your publishing. It’s called the SUNDAY times, not the ‘when-I-can-be-bothered-to-publish’-Times
  • Know your audience, know who you are writing for (“85% of all my readers are 100% female”)
  • Create a voice and don’t be boring
  • Use characters in your stories
  • Never ever, ever let an idea escape. Write it down right away.
  • “I dont believe writers block exists. Just sit down and after 25 minutes inspiration will come”
  • The power of a good story will overcome the quality of the writing
  • Basic set-up of a story: normal world > inciting incident > hero reacts to it > quest > climax
  • There must be a moment of self doubt for every travel blogger. That moment when you come back home, with no house, no partner or kids and as yourself – was it worth it?
  • What readers really want is practical advice, money saving tips and to ‘get it right’. They only go on a holiday 3 weeks per year and saved up. They want the blogger stopping them from making an mistake
  • A blog post of 600 words takes about 2-3 minutes to read. This seems to work best. But make sure to fill it with links to provide your reader with even more value.

 

 

 
 

Bloggen als een Business - TBU Nantes Conferentie Samenvatting

 
 
 

Successful Advertising and Partnerships

Terry Lee (@LiveShareTravel)

 

  • Making a living out of blogging is not an easy job and we still got some seriousissues to discuss
  • What is it that sets the successful bloggers apart from the unsuccessful bloggers? What makes you so special? what’s your USP (Unique Selling Point)? What will make clients pay you for?
  • Are you a businessman/woman? No? Then Houston, we have a problem
  • BLOGGING IS A BUSINESS
  • You cannot run a succesful business without money.
  • There is no company without a budget. If they do not understand the value bloggers can bring, it’s our job to teach them
  • Never think as bloggers: “we are not worthy, we don’t require payment”. You need to ask for it. Payment is EXPECTED in order for your work and time.
  • When you are out there working for free, you miss the oportunity to get paid
  • A blogtrip is simply part of the marketing campaign, the price of everything combined is never too high. Think of tech bloggers, they always receive (and get to keep) high value products and still get paid on top of that
  • You wouldnt apply for a job and not ask for money, so why do that at blogging?
  • You need at least 3 years worth of finance to start your business up
  • Put a media kit on your website (or provide a contact address for people to getone)
  • Learn negotiation and sales skills as soon as you can
  • Don’t assume ou can go in alone on this. Ask for help and get a mentor
  • Meeting your clients needs will bring success

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Bloggen als een Business - TBU Nantes Conferentie Samenvatting

 
 
 

Closing Panel: Blogging as a Business

 

Key Take-Aways

  • If you don’t treat it as a business, it will never be one (Leyla Giray Alynak)
  • I’ve seen a lot of talented bloggers pull out because they couldn’t figure out a way to make enough money from it (Terry Lee)
  • Consistency is the most important thing. As an entrepreneur we have to build a platform to market and promote ourselves to make a business out of it (Renee Lo Iacono)
  • We are so much more than just bloggers: we have a whole skilset that we can offer (Guillarme)
  • I didn’t realize it could be done to make a living out of blogging, we really need to focus more on the HOW now: how to we know what we’re worth, how can we approach companies, etc. (Leyla Giray Alynak)

 

How to Work with PR/Companies

  • Realize that it’s all about the client, not about you. When talking to PR’s, make sure to ask them ‘what are you doing now and what are your aims for the next year(s)?’, then let them know how you can help them acchieve their goals (Terry Lee)
  • Build relationships: pick up the phone, meet and have a conversation with PR’s, etc. (Sarah Lee)
  • Attend networking events, I visit about three of them each week and dress for work every single day (Renee Lo Iacono) 

 

About Pitching

  • The difference between someone that charges 30 and someone that charges 500$ for a post is confidence (Renee Lo Iacono)
  • Blogger think too small. There is usually a budget for a campaign (Sarah Lee)
  • Whether you pitch small (hotel/flight compensated) or big, it takes just as much time to sort it out, so often the small things aren’t even worth the effort (Leyla Giray Alynak)
  • I often find it hard to figure out exactly where my readers are from and pitch that (Leyla) > Tell them: ‘8% of my readers are from your planet’ (Alistair) > an American blogger in Spain had mostly readers from Spain and found it hard to work with American companies, but it turned out that most of them where in fact Americans on exchange, so always survey your readers (Oliver Gradwell)

 

How to go Further

  • Ask yourself: ‘Who am I? What do I really want?’ (Renee Lo Iacono)
  • Think about collaborations, learn from others, don’t make the same mistakes as them and make sure to always fund yourself a few years (Terry Lee)
  • Short Term thinking is the biggest problem with bloggers. You should know what kind of business you are in. And think about networking out of your niche. (Robert McIntosh)
  • Look beyond travel brands to form collaborations with (Sarah Lee)
  • Invest in your business and always be credible (Simon Falvo)

 

Bloggen als een Business - TBU Nantes Conferentie Samenvatting

 

The Travel Tester Blog: Practical

Bekijk meer handige blog tips op mijn Pinterest Bord:

 

Follow The Travel Tester | Nienke Krook’s board Blogging Tips on Pinterest.

 

 
 

The Travel Tester Blog: Now it's your turn!

Heb je iets van mijn aantekeningen opgestoken? Ik hoop het! En zie jij bloggen al als een echte business? Laat het me weten!

 
 

Bedankt voor het delen van dit artikel op Pinterest:

Blogging as a Business - TBU Nantes Conference Recap

 
 

[dropshadowbox align=”none” effect=”lifted-bottom-right” width=”550px” height=”” background_color=”#d1e4f1″ border_width=”1″ border_color=”#dddddd” ]>Travel Bloggers Essential Toolkit<

How to Start a Blog:

Business Essentials

Social Media Management

^ links above are affiliate links
[/dropshadowbox]
[:]

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