Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity – The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10]

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester
Have you always wondered how you can turn your blog into a business? Then this series is for you!

In the past 5 years, I’ve visited over 30 (travel) blogging conferences and workshops. That is hours and hours of inspirational and practical advice that helped me turn blogging from a hobby into a full-time business.

In this series (every Tuesday for the next 10 weeks!), I finally open up my notebook to the world and share the insights that I personally found most valuable with you, so you can use them to hopefully make your own blog bigger and better. 


Today, we’re diving into the topic of blogging as a business and having that professional mindset. We also share the best productivity tips. Enjoy!

 

BLOGGING AS A BUSINESS

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

 

WHAT IS THE VALUE OF A BLOGGER?

 

People are not interested in advertising anymore. Bloggers, on the other hand, tell stories. This attracts people (‘tell me more!’). Stories also make people memorize and even share something quicker. So when we were looking for people to tell the story of our destination, we turned to bloggers. Before we made the story ourselves, now we look for other people’s stories to share.

– Jaume Marin (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

We’ve known for a couple of years now that the traditional booking funnel in the travel industry is getting outdated. The standard concept of push-marking, where providing information leads to interest, then desire and then action, is something from the beginning of the 20th century. It doesn’t work like that anymore. So marketing needs to get more creative. And working with bloggers is a great way to do just that.

– Debbie Hindle (WTM London – Nov ’13)

 

Travel bloggers are of great value, because they already talk to potential customers of companies. They already have a specific niche and demographic they communicate with. Selected for the right campaigns, they can create amazing and relevant content. Bloggers can bring travel destinations alive, as they use their own content and their own world to show new travellers what they too can experience.

– Debbie Hindle (WTM London – Nov ’13)

 

Not only do travel bloggers share their experience, they become niche experts that create interaction and built trust over time. And that trust is vital to give readers a nudge to want that same experience. That’s when inspiration leads to a reaction (like booking the same tour/accommodation) and that’s when bloggers change consumers’ booking decisions.

– Keith Jenkins (WTM London – Nov ’13)

 

Bloggers are multimedia strategists, sales people and, importantly, business people.

– Sarah Lee (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

How bloggers are contributing to destination marketing: content, social media, interaction, community building, new marketing concepts.

– Melvin Boecher (TBDI Italy – Oct ’14)

 

Travel bloggers deliver both immediate as long-term value:
1. pre-trip (publishing itinerary, inviting followers to follow live)
2. during the trip (sharing experiences via social channels and answering questions on the location)
3. post-trip (publishing blogs up to several months after trip ensuring prolonged exposure)
4. post-trip campaign (social media campaign that leverages the blogger content and social networks to showcase the destination as well as the sponsors)

– Melvin Boecher (TBDI Italy – Oct ’15)

 

Benefits of working with bloggers: [Short Term] digital storytelling, immediate exposure via social media, real-time interaction [Long Term] content (long life, SEO), varied (photo essays, videos, panoramas), destination/brand ambassadors, relationship!

– Daniel Noll & Audrey Scott (ITB Berlin – Mar ’14)

 

Companies often don’t realize how valuable the content bloggers produce is: it stays online for a very long time.

– Claudia Saleh (WTM London – Nov ’13)

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

 

 

THE FUTURE OF TRAVEL BLOGGING

 

Developments in the travel blogging landscape: growing number of professional travel bloggers, travel blogging conferences, blogger associations, networks and initiatives, the rise of niche/local language blogging, product development, innovative forms of collaboration

– Melvin Boecher (TBDI Italy – Oct ’14)

 

What does the future mean for us today?

– Nick Westergaard (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most adaptable to change.

– Nick Westergaard (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

Every couple of days, the internet doubles itself! Are we creating content for the sake of creating content?

– Nick Westergaard (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

Focus on more strategic, visual and video-focused content. Think about the “What, Why, Where, How, When, Who?”

– Nick Westergaard (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

Find your niche, think big and then totally go for it.

– Anne Faber (The Hive Copenhagen – May ’14)

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

 

GETTING IN THE RIGHT MINDSET

 

Four acts of blogging: 1) Passion 2) Skills 3) Value 4) Freedom

– Daniel Noll and Audrey Scott (TBEX Dublin – September ’13)

 

To leap from hobby to profession, treat your site as a business, not a vanity project.

– Aygelina Brogan & Michael Hodson (TBDI Italy – Oct ’13)

 

Are you a ‘blogger’, or a ‘publisher’ or ‘writer’? Do you say you have a ‘blog’, or an ‘online magazine? (with a blog on it)? It might make the difference between being an amateur or a pro.

– Sarah Lee (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

The 3 P’s in blogging: Passion, Personality and Products. Blogging as a business is something you can only do if you’re in it for the long run. And to do that, you need to have a big BIG passion for what you write about. By showing that passion and telling readers about your life and how they can also implement what you’re writing about into their own lives, you start speaking to them. Only when you start speaking to them, you can create products your audience is interested in (they will even ask you) and that’s when your blogging empire really kicks off.

– Elsie Larson and Emma Chapman (Meet the Blogger Amsterdam – Oct ’16)

 

Be sure it’s you curating your own career.

– Robert Reid (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

Work for a living. Free does NOT pay.

– Sarah Lee  (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

You cannot run a successful business without money. Learn negotiation and sales skills as soon as you can.

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Sep ’14)

 

Take responsibility if your aim is to be a professional.

– Kash Bhattacharya (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

Don’t work for free! ‘Bloggers are amazing talented professionals! The only time you should work for free is for your mum.

– Anne Ditmeyer (Blogtacular London – May ’14)

 

Don’t get caught in the trap of working for free. Only fools and slaves do that. You should be paid for work. A flight and a hotel room are not a payment. There’s a lot of work involved after a trip. Every time you go on a trip for free, you send the message that your work has no value. A blog trip is simply part of the marketing campaign, the price of everything combined is never too high. Think of tech bloggers, they always receive (and get to keep) high value products and still get paid on top of that.

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Sep ’14)

 

There is no company without a budget. If they do not understand the value bloggers can bring, it’s our job to teach them. Never think as bloggers: “we are not worthy, we don’t require payment”. You need to ask for it. Payment is EXPECTED in order for your work and time. When you are out there working for free, you miss the opportunity to get paid. You wouldn’t apply for a job and not ask for money, so why do that at blogging?

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Sep ’14)

 

With 2000 followers a month, you no longer have just your family and friends reading along, with 20.000 you’re pretty much running a local newspaper on your own. With 200.000 readers, you are the New York Times.

– Melvin Boecher (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

 

What if integrity, business and quality are not at odds after all?

– Daniel Noll and Audrey Scott (TBEX Dublin – September ’13)

 

To create new revenue possibilities, consider yourself a publisher instead of a writer.

– Aygelina Brogan & Michael Hodson (TBDI Italy – Oct ’13)

 

To thrive in the current world of digital publishing, you have to see yourself as an innovator. Don’t always think about projects for your own blog, but think beyond it. Solve a problem that no one else sees.

– Kash Bhattacharya (Traverse Newcastle – Feb ’14)

 

Allow yourself to be creative. You have to let go of the idea of travel blogging as just writing blog posts on your own platform. Think differently and give people a new idea of travel. Also, work with people you know and trust.

– Kash Bhattacharya (Traverse Newcastle – Feb ’14)

 

Creativity is a habit. Practice it every day in some form. Cultivate your habit. Don’t be afraid of doing the unexpected.

– Natalie Lue (Blogtacular London – May ’14)

 

You are the horse, not the hero. Entrepreneurism is not about you, it’s about finding out what the big issue for your audience and how you can help them.

– Tine Thygesen (TBU Nantes – Aug ’14)

 

Being successful in blogging is about finding where the opportunities lie, and grabbing them by filling the gap. Look for other possibilities when you feel like there is a gap between what you’re currently doing on your blog and what you’d like to be doing, but feel like your blog isn’t the right place for at the moment. Your blog really is a stepping stone to other things. If you want to run ads or sponsored posts, that don’t really fit in with your personal style on your blog, a second blog might be the best place to do this.

– Brooke Schoenman (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

My blog is a business. I look for advertisers, hire writing staff and use stock images to create a professional look. I am constantly looking at what works well for my audience and aren’t afraid to try new things.

– Brooke Schoenman (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

Get yourself out there: write guest posts, build expertise by starting a themed newsletter/FB Group/Google+ Group or Twitter Chat, gain eyes to your work by using other audiences (for example writing on food websites or magazines) and to gain income by freelance writing, consulting or working on social media campaigns.

– Brooke Schoenman (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

Adopt a Business Mindset, Be Professional, Understand Your Worth, Learn from the Successful, Have a Portfolio of Offerings, Deliver for Your Clients.

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Sep ’14)

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

 

CREATING A BUSINESS STRATEGY

 

If you spend a lot of time blogging and want to make money, guess what? You’re a business owner!

– Lora Jakobsen (The Hive Copenhagen – May ’14)

 

If you don’t treat it as a business, it will never be one.

– Leyla Giray Alynak (TBU Nantes – Aug ’14)

 

Short Term thinking is the biggest problem with bloggers.

– Robert McIntosh (TBU Nantes – Aug ’14)

 

I’ve seen a lot of talented bloggers pull out because they couldn’t figure out a way to make enough money from it

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Aug ’14)

 

You need at least 3 years worth of finance to start your business up. If you want to monetize your travel blog, you will have to take 3 years to build you reputation and your brand.

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Sep ’14)

 

In the first year of starting your travel blog, you are basically setting up your business, but if you’ve made it past this one year mark, you have to keep your skills updates over time to stay in the game.

– Michael Hodson and Ayngelina Brogan (TBDI Italy – Oct ’14)

 

Run your blog as a traditional business: create an annual business plan with quarterly reviews, review tactics and change plans as needed, create communication plans on where to market and advertise, determine where you need to outsource expertise, professional development, networking, etc.

– Aygelina Brogan & Michael Hodson (TBDI Italy – Oct ’13)

 

How to build a strategy: pick your own, set measurable goals, define what success looks like to you, dress for the job you want, think of a sustainable business model.

– Kate McCulley & Katja Presnal (TBDI Italy – Oct ’13)

 

Invest in your business and always be credible.

– Simon Falvo (TBU Nantes – Aug ’14)

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

 

A vision statement is about your most important goals and provides direction and inspiration for your business’ future.

– Janice Waugh and Keith Jenkins (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

A mission statement describes what your business will do yo achieve its vision.

– Janice Waugh and Keith Jenkins (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

What does your life look like in 5-10 years? What revenue will support that life? What functions will you perform in your blog that will fit that life? (revenue/staff/writers). How do you build on your interests & strengths?

– Janice Waugh and Keith Jenkins (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

Build your Business Model:
* Market Segments (niche)
* Audience
* Prospective clients
* Revenue Streams
* Products & Pricing
* Asset Development

– Janice Waugh and Keith Jenkins (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

Prioritise in terms of:
* Long v.s. short term goals
* Opportunity cost
* Areas where assistance is required
* Developing and managing relationships
* Professionalism across the board

– Janice Waugh and Keith Jenkins (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

Keep focus and prioritize!

– Janice Waugh and Keith Jenkins (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

Make sure you always maintain your own professional standards:
* Reporting
* Invoicing
* Branding
* Presence at conferences

– Janice Waugh and Keith Jenkins (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

Work IN the business:
* Blog Posts
* Social Media
* Email

– Janice Waugh and Keith Jenkins (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

Work ON the business:
* Monitor results
* Make small changes to improve results
* Try new things to get more results

– Janice Waugh and Keith Jenkins (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

There are just 2 rules to success: 1) Give people what they want 2) Do it better than the alternatives

– Gary Bembridge (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

Just as variety is the spice of life, diversification is the key to success in business. As people we are not one dimensional. Nor should your business be.

– Sarah Lee  (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

Blogging is a human exercise.

– Daniel Noll & Audrey Scott (ITB Berlin – Mar ’14)

 

Consistency is the most important thing. As an entrepreneur we have to build a platform to market and promote ourselves to make a business out of it

– Renee Lo Iacono (TBU Nantes – Aug ’14)

 

Deliver consistently in terms of content, quality of writing and voice for your blog. There is a reason it’s called the ‘Sunday Times’ and not the ‘Can’t-be-bothered-to-publish’-Times.

– Mark Richards (TBU Nantes – Sep ’14)

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

Build a business portfolio with the best of your blog, marketing & PR efforts, authoring books, speaking engagements, freelance travel and business writing, special projects (TV, etc.)

– Sarah Lee (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

Develop a portfolio with your offerings: sponsorship, campaigns (solo/group), social campaigns, product reviews, competitions, promotional offers, newsletter ads, banner ads, etc.

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Sep ’14)

 

Key elements of making your passion to business strategy: showcase yourself as an expert, engage with travel community and make connections in the industry, provide value for your audience, create an enchanting story, create balance between personal life and work.

– Kate McCulley & Katja Presnal (TBDI Italy – Oct ’13)

 

To evaluate your success, review your income, projects and passions.

– Julie Falconer (Traverse Newcastle – Feb ’14)

 

Learn to delegate an work with good people who know their shit.

– Kash Bhattacharya (Traverse Newcastle – Feb ’14)

 

Think about collaborations, learn from others, don’t make the same mistakes as them.

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Aug ’14)

 

At times we get so caught up in our own projects, we forget to share those of others. Share, Share, Reshare…. Support each other and great work.

– Anne Ditmeyer (Blogtacular London – May ’14)

 

Team up and your voice will carry further.

– Angelika Schwaff (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

 

 

THE HARD PART OF BLOGGING

 

What is your WHY?

– Kash Bhattacharya (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Ask yourself: ‘Who am I? What do I really want?’

– Renee Lo Iacono (TBU Nantes – Aug ’14)

 

How do you introduce yourself when others ask you who you are?

– Lola Akinmade Akerstrom (TBEX Stockholm – Jul ’16)

 

Find your WHY:
* What inspires you?
* How can you get it when you need it?
* What are 3 things you are proud of?
* What are your blocks?
* What are your releases?
* What is your BIG dream/vision?
* What are your top 3 strengths? (what advice would someone ask you)
* How can you use your strengths when working on your blog?

– Karen Sargent (Blogstock UK – Sep ’14)

 

Be patient: it takes at least a year to find your voice and develop a following.

– Aygelina Brogan & Michael Hodson (TBDI Italy – Oct ’13)

 

Prepare for negativity: even if you’re selflessly giving a kidney away, people will always complain. Just be prepared for that.

– Johnny Jet (TBEX Dublin – September ’13)

 

Be prepared to fail. Many times.

– Kash Bhattacharya (Traverse Newcastle – Feb ’14)

 

Most women suffer from a level of imposter syndrome. We don’t spend enough time recognising all the things we do.

– Natalie Lue (Blogtacular London – May ’14)

 

Fail is a part of the journey – perfection is dangerous.

– Tine Thygesen (The Hive Copenhagen – May ’14)

 

Life will go on, everybody will still love you even if it’s not perfect.

– Joy Cho (Blogtacular London – May ’14)

 

Survive long enough for success to be possible.

– Tine Thygesen (TBU Nantes – Aug ’14)

 

Success is failure turned inside out, the silver tint of the clouds of doubt. There are a lot of opportunities we can derive from failure, we just need to know how to.

– Kash Bhattacharya (Traverse Newcastle – Feb ’14)

 

The best thing a blogger can do is not focus on comparison. If you try and do what others are doing in the industry, you’ll lose sight of who you are.

– Will Taylor (Blogtacular London – May ’14)

 

What is it that sets the successful bloggers apart from the unsuccessful bloggers? What makes you so special? what’s your USP (Unique Selling Point)? What will make clients pay you for? Are you a businessman/woman? No? Then Houston, we have a problem.

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Sep ’14)

 

Don’t assume you can go in alone on this. Ask for help and get a mentor.

– Terry Lee (TBU Nantes – Sep ’14)

 

Be smart. Do things that make the rest of us look good.

– Kate McCulley (TBU Rotterdam – May ’13)

 

Don’t live lives of regret but rather expand our approach to tackling life changes as they come.

– Lola Akinmade Akerstrom (TBEX Stockholm – Jul ’16)

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel TesterBlogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

 

BETTER BLOGGING – PRODUCTIVITY TIPS

 

Stand out by doing less with greater focus.

– Nick Westergaard (STS Kitzbuehel – Sep ’17)

 

Getting things done:
* What key outcomes can you achieve this month?
* What key outcome can you achieve this week?
* How will you know you have achieved it?
* What is the first specific step you will take to make it happen?
* When will you take this step?

– Karen Sargent (Blogstock UK – Sep ’14)

 

High impact strategies that can help you become more productive in your business:
* Farm out what can be done better and cheaper
* Focus on a few things that really matter
* Use email, phone and social media like you’re the boss, not the slave
* Automate what’s easily automated.

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

Spend most of your time on accomplishing tasks:
* Generating revenue
* Creating content
* Expanding your audience
* Delegating projects
* Managing assistants or writers

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

Ask yourself: “Will getting this done move my business and earnings forward in a meaningful way?”

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

 

Focus on what matters
* Have a velvet rope to-do list: Pick 1-3 things daily that matter (or 10-15 per week)
* Do those things
* Exercise, eat well and sleep enough

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

Slay your dragons early in the morning

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

Be the boss of accomplishing tasks:
* Batch tasks like photo editing, video editing, affiliate link insertions, etc.
* Set hard deadlines and publishing schedules
* Let deadline projects past the velvet rope
* Save routine, non-thinking tasks for your body clock’s low point
* Write 1st drafts with the WiFi off (no research)
* Write final edits with WiFi off (no distractions)
* Do strategic planning with no distractions
* Use the phone and make real decisions
* Use leverage, scale and amplification

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

Be the boss of your communication tools:
* Batch email several times a day
* Don’t open email in the morning until something is accomplished
* Have a set social media time budget and turn it off otherwise
* Turn of dings, pings and alerts
* Leave your smartphone in another room during working hours

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

Email is not a chat program, you can answer whenever you want.

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

Automation & systemizing tools: Mozilla Thunderbird, Hootsuite, RSS Graffiti, LeadPages, Buffer, Mention, Boomerang, MailChimp, LastPass, etc.

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

It’s not about Time Management, it’s about Attention Management (Proactive/Active/Inactive attention). The right time + the right type of attention = Job Done!

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

What is your average workday attention? Write down in 2 columns: time of day / type of attention, then highlight the best and worst times of the day to give yourself complex tasks.

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Proactive Tasks:
* making critical and strategic key decisions
* planning/reviewing blog posts/video/trips
* critical emails
* skype emails when you need to be active
* consulting work
* creative thinking: creating content, writing, editing

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Active Tasks:
* scheduling work for the day
* scheduling social media
* replying on social media
* internet research
* email processing
* attending meetings
* editing photos
* reading feedly/rss
* update old posts on website

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Inactive Tasks:
* something personal that’s important to me
* organising laptop
* printing travel tickets
* making route maps
* backing up
* ordering gear
* deleting emails
* going through business cards
* eating cake

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Protect your attention from the ‘evils’:
* Get new ideas off your mind as quickly as possible
* Process email rather than check email
* YouTube / Facebook FAST
* Look for the DJs rather than records (Facebook Groups / Traverse)
* Don’t be an early adopter
* Be self aware (tidying/eating/doing easier,interesting stuff)
* Avoid most meetings
* Say NO

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Increase your magical flow:
* Change your view
* Change the name
* Air
* Water
* Coffee
* Exercise
* Meditate
* Sleep
* YOUR WORK IS NOT YOUR LIFE!

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Cast your spells to create additional attention + time:
* Walk & Talk (friends/clients/snapping)
* Read & Wait (book/pocket app/rss)
* Travel & Think (airport/que/shower > critical decisions)

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Getting Things Done:
1. COLLECT – bring it all together: notes / receipts / forms / business cards / etc.
2. CAPTURE – ideas / worries / thoughts / etc. (personal & business)
3. CLEAR – social messages / email / paperwork / etc.
4. CHECK – calendar / follow ups / flights & tickets to book / start conversations / etc.
5. ACTION – divide tasks into small chunks and add to master actions list, update ‘waiting on’ list, update projects list

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Create a ‘get it out of my head’-list for all your brain dumps

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Create a ‘waiting on’-list for tracking all people who are doing things for you (that you want to make sure you actually get done)

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Create a ‘master actions’- list with every single specific action you could do for each project.

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Create a ‘Current Projects List’ for things that take a couple steps to complete (blog posts to write, trips to research, brands to collab with, self-study, blog design and personal things) and then create a ‘Master List’ (specific activities/steps to do labeled with your workday attention + location)

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Create a ‘Weekly Checklist’ every Friday (do a deep dive of 1-2 hours) and go through it every morning (5 min) to move items to the ‘Daily Checklist’ (check deadlines for next 3-5 days, pick max. three items that need heavy focus, select one task you don’t want to do (do it first!), separate proactive & inactive task to do on the right time of day based on your own energy levels, think in advance if any tasks require time/people/resources)

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Weekly Goals:

* what are your priorities / main activities?
* are there any events this week?
* do you have any story ideas?
* are there any opportunities this week?
* do you have any meetings / calls?
* do you need anything else? (documents / reading material / travel tickets / check-in online / time schedule / directions / confirm meetings & calls / ask for more information / etc.)
* best pro-active moment of the week?
* 3 tasks to delete (not critical or to be delegated)?
* best moment to switch off?
* anything you resist? (what is the smallest step you can take to move forward?)

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

End of Month Goals:

* social numbers
* newsletter numbers
* traffic numbers
* income numbers
* main business project
* personal project
* social time
* other things

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Four ways to be your best:
1. Schedule work according your attention level
2. Protect your attention from the ‘evils’
3. Increase your magical flow
4. Cast your spells to create additional attention + time

– Alice Nettleingham (Traverse London – Apr ’17)

 

Hire help and go from solo-preneur to business owner. Help can be on different aspects of your business, for example in Tech, Admin or Design. Those who are willing to invest money often will make more money as a result.

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

 

Plenty of people are looking for work: craigslist, elance, odesk, fiverr, envato studios, sologig, virtualstafffinder.com, taskrabbit, local universities.

– Tim Leffel (TBEX Athens – Oct ’14)

 

Blogging as a Business: Mindset & Productivity - The Best Insights from Travel Blogging Conferences in the Last 5 Years! [1/10] || The Travel Tester

 

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I hope you read something interesting that you can turn into an action step for your own blogging business. Let me know what your favourite insight was!

 

 

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